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kazaa


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#1
BRogers

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I have downloaded Kazaa- P2P -free version. It appears that I am downloading the songs. It shows dowload complete. But when I go to play the song there is no sound. I downloaded 5 different songs and only one played. I have tried to open the other songs in Kazaa and also in my Windows Media player and there is no music. Is there something I may have missed in downloading the program? Thank you. :tazz:
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#2
Tim Wellman

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first, the disclaimer... P2P music sharing is illegal, and Kazaa has just filled your computer with spyware

Now, the problem... you say the download says it's completed. Did these music files say they were 128kbs when downloading them? If there's no kbs rate for a particular song, it's either corrupt, or has been encoded in the newer variable rate encode... er... thingie. So that soft parts of a song are compressed to maybe 32kbs, while loud sections may be looser, up to 192kbs... if you don't have a newer player, like winamp, you might not be able to play these newer files. If the files themselves are in the 3meg size range on your harddrive (you can usually count 1 meg for each minute of a 128kbs encoded mp3), then you may want to try downloading winamp and see if they play in that.

If not, just download songs that show they're 128kps... er no, don't download songs at all... because it's illegal, and the billionaire record company owners won't be able to afford to send their daughters to rehab if you cheat them out of 50 cents :-)
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#3
-=jonnyrotten=-

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Usually when you download anything (from P2P programs) and it doesn't do what it's supposed to do you have just ran a nifty little install program for some sort of malware.

Cheating the record companies isn't the only reason you shouldn't download music. :tazz:

-=jonnyrotten=-
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#4
pip22

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It's also possible the files are 'duds'. Planted by the RIAA and it's supporters to deter people from using kazaa. But, in any event, it is illegal and I wouldn't stick my neck out by using it. What's more, it's an ideal way to spread and pick up viruses. Then there's the bundled spyware. Do the right thing - Get rid of it.
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#5
BRogers

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Thanks for your all your responses. When I looked into the program I read that is it financially sponsored by companies that place adds. Therefore they pay for it and it is not illegal. (I know they also add spyware) I also pay a quite expensive annual fee and am a member of ASCAP that pays for use of music. :tazz: As far as the spyware, do you think spybot and adware are good enough to keep the spyware off my system? Also, they offer Bullfrog antivirus that is supposed to scan the files... is that reliable or am I safe with my own Nortons? I am pretty computer illiterate and was wondering if when I open Kazaa each time does it download spyware? Or is it during the initial set up? After I downloaded it I ran my spybot and adware and did find quite a bit of spyware on my system. Is it gone now? ;) Again, thanks!
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