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#1
bLuE_oMeGa

bLuE_oMeGa

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How do we call the pale blue screen you get when your pc just rebooted after a checkdisk or the file that starts triggers this frame? A colleague of mine needs to know this. We are certain it has a specific name, but we're unable to find it on the net, can someone help us?
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#2
Ordinateur

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Does the following help?

WINDOWS XP BOOT SEQUENCE

As with other Windows Operating Systems, when you turn on your PC, it goes through an elaborate boot up process. It begins when the computer performs the POST (power-on self test), followed by the POST for each adapter card that has a BIOS, for example, your video card. The BIOS then reads the MBR (Master Boot Record) which is in the first sector of the first hard disk and transfers control to the code in the MBR which is created by the XP Setup. This is where Windows takes over the startup process.

What comes next? Here's what happens:

1. The MBR reads the boot sector which is the first sector of the active partition.This sector contains the code that starts Ntldr which is the boot strap loader for Windows XP. The first role of Ntldr is to allow full memory addressing, start the file system, read boot.ini and put up the boot menu. IMPORTANT: Ntldr must be located in root folder of the active partition along with Ntdetect.com, boot.ini, bootsect.dos (for dual booting) and Ntbootdd.sys (needed with some SCSI adapters).

2. Selecting XP from the boot menu causes Ntldr to run Ntdetect.com to get information about installed hardware. Ntldr then uses the ARC path specified in the boot.ini to find the boot partition. The one where Windows XP is installed.

3. Ntldr reads the registry files, selects a hardware profile, control set and loads device drivers, in that order.

4. Then, Ntoskrnl.exe takes over and starts Winlogon.exe which starts Lsass.exe (Local Security Administration), this is the program that displays the Welcome screen (If Professional Edition-the Windows Log On dialog box), and allows the user to log on with his/her user name and password.

Not sure where your question is leading, but take a look at http://support.micro...kb;en-us;232575
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#3
Ordinateur

Ordinateur

    IT Professional

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  • 9 posts
Does the following help?

WINDOWS XP BOOT SEQUENCE

As with other Windows Operating Systems, when you turn on your PC, it goes through an elaborate boot up process. It begins when the computer performs the POST (power-on self test), followed by the POST for each adapter card that has a BIOS, for example, your video card. The BIOS then reads the MBR (Master Boot Record) which is in the first sector of the first hard disk and transfers control to the code in the MBR which is created by the XP Setup. This is where Windows takes over the startup process.

What comes next? Here's what happens:

1. The MBR reads the boot sector which is the first sector of the active partition.This sector contains the code that starts Ntldr which is the boot strap loader for Windows XP. The first role of Ntldr is to allow full memory addressing, start the file system, read boot.ini and put up the boot menu. IMPORTANT: Ntldr must be located in root folder of the active partition along with Ntdetect.com, boot.ini, bootsect.dos (for dual booting) and Ntbootdd.sys (needed with some SCSI adapters).

2. Selecting XP from the boot menu causes Ntldr to run Ntdetect.com to get information about installed hardware. Ntldr then uses the ARC path specified in the boot.ini to find the boot partition. The one where Windows XP is installed.

3. Ntldr reads the registry files, selects a hardware profile, control set and loads device drivers, in that order.

4. Then, Ntoskrnl.exe takes over and starts Winlogon.exe which starts Lsass.exe (Local Security Administration), this is the program that displays the Welcome screen (If Professional Edition-the Windows Log On dialog box), and allows the user to log on with his/her user name and password.

Not sure where your question is leading, but take a look at How to trace Winlogon activity in Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, Windows 2000, and Windows NT
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