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Having more than one OS?


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#1
kschubert

kschubert

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i know its possible but how? i currently have xp installed but i would like to also have linux on my system too. How is this done?
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#2
Kemasa

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There are multiple ways to do it. You can boot from a CD, such as Knoppix or DSL OS. You can add a second disk to install Linux there. You can also put it on the current system disk, but first you have to make space and that can be an issue. Part of the answer depends on whether you want to reload XP or want to retain what you have.

If you have enough free space on your current disk you can reduce the size of it using something like qtparted (Knoppix), but first backup the disk and then defrag it. If you have enough space free, then you can install Linux. I personally suggest around 4Gb for the root partition, 100Mb for the /boot partition, around 512Mb for swap and then around 4Gb or so for /home.

If you are going to reload everything, then first start with XP since you want to use the Linux boot loader. I prefer Grub since you can edit the boot information without having to re-install it in the boot block.

You also need to decide which distribution you want to use. I prefer Mandriva personally, but there are other good distros too. I would also strongly suggest getting/making a Knoppix CD since that is useful if you have problems, even with Windoze.
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#3
lovethepirk

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If I were you, I would begin googling "linux distros" and find the one that appeals to you the most. 'Suse' is an excellent distro for a newbie from what I hear and the installation is very easy. On the other end of the spectrum is a distro called 'Debian' that is for the more taylored for the technically saavy linux users. I am a relatively new linux user and I am running a duel xp/linux boot. I use Kubuntu. That is a derivative of Debian, but a bit more kind to the newbie type :)

Once you decide on a distro you have several options to start an install:
1) You can download a large .iso file(1-3 gigs) and burn it to a single DVD

2) You can download many .iso's and burn roughly 6-10 CD's(*sigh*)

3) You can do a net install which is downloading about 100 MB .iso file, burn that to a CD-R and that will install a "base" linux system on your computer and from there you install the rest of the system over the internet. :) :tazz:

Burning .iso files to a CD is easy but you do need to learn how to do it and have the buring software that can do it. I am sure there is free software out there that can so this...just google it :woot:

Each distro should have a somewhat centralized webpage for all the installation files and there multiple download locations.

Have fun.

Edited by lovethepirk, 26 December 2005 - 10:18 AM.

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#4
Kemasa

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Another way to help decide which distro to use is to look up and see if there are any Linux users groups in your area (most likely there are several). Talk to the people there. Even if it is not the best, you may have people to help you :-).
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