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Quick License Question.


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#1
KindKill

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With Windows XP can you install the operating system on 2 machines? I have an old computer and i am building a new one, and instead of spending another $100+ for an OS, can i copy this hard drive to my next? I want to know if it is 100% nessisary to buy another windows disk.
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#2
peterm

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It is time to shell out the money and buy another disc.
1. GRANT OF LICENSE. Microsoft grants you the following rights provided that you comply with all terms and conditions of this EULA:

• Installation and use. You may install, use, access, display and run one copy of the Product on a single computer, such as a workstation, terminal or other device ("Workstation Computer"). The Product may not be used by more than two (2) processors at any one time on any single Workstation Computer. You may permit a maximum of ten (10) computers or other electronic devices (each a "Device") to connect to the Workstation Computer to utilize the services of the Product solely for File and Print services, Internet Information Services, and remote access (including connection sharing and telephony services). The ten connection maximum includes any indirect connections made through "multiplexing" or other software or hardware which pools or aggregates connections. Except as otherwise permitted by the NetMeeting, Remote Assistance, and Remote Desktop features described below, you may not use the Product to permit any Device to use, access, display or run other executable software residing on the Workstation Computer, nor may you permit any Device to use, access, display, or run the Product or Product's user interface, unless the Device has a separate license for the Product.

Edited by peterm, 25 December 2005 - 06:55 PM.

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#3
KindKill

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And even if i was to use that license on a new computer?
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#4
peterm

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For every computer old or new you need a cd or buy a new license
You can have 1 cd and buy another license of Microsoft
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#5
Neil Jones

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You can use the same CD to install Windows onto the second computer BUT you will need another licence key as the current one is now tied to the other computer.

But having said that, assuming you have a retail copy of XP (that you bought from Amazon or wherever), then you can transfer it to the new computer BUT YOU MUST remove it from the old computer first - uninstall it, wipe the drive, etc, before putting it on your new build.

If you have an OEM copy of XP then one of two scenarios applies:

1) If its an OEM copy that's tied to one machine (usually a branded machine - HP, Compaq, eMachines, etc) then you are NOT ALLOWED to transfer it and it either dies or goes with the machine. A new licence would be required.

2) If its a generic OEM copy that was sold with qualifying hardware then legally its tied to the machine it was activated on and again it either dies or goes with that machine. Again you'd need a new licence. Only difference with this way is that you're not tied to a specific machine until its activated, whereas above its stuck with it instantly. Some may argue that its transferrable but legally it isn't.

Edited by Neil Jones, 26 December 2005 - 05:25 AM.

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#6
gerryf

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ahh, but what makes a machine it is activated on a machine?

Define machine? What is its heart? Where does its soul reside? The drive? the motherboard? The CPU?

If a lightning strike kills a motherboard and modem, does replacing that modem and motherboard invalidate the license?

Don't mind me...feeling philisophical today
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#7
Retired Tech

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It could be taken that you only need to reactivate over the phone

Can hardware components be changed and upgraded?

Product Activation is able to tolerate a certain degree of change in a hardware configuration by allowing a current hash value to have a degree of difference from the hash value that was originally activated. As a result, users can change their hardware without the product believing it is on a different PC than the one it was activated on. If the user completely overhauls the hardware making substantial hardware changes (even over long periods of time), reactivation may be required. In that case, users may need to contact to contact a Microsoft customer service representative by telephone to reactivate.

Are the changes cumulative? In other words, if I change one component today and one tomorrow, is that two component changes?

The changes are cumulative; however, if a user is asked to reactivate, the hardware profile is reset to that new configuration.

Product Activation keeps users from changing or upgrading their hardware.
Not true at all. Users can change or upgrade their hardware. One of the forms of piracy that Product Activation guards against is hard disk imaging. Not all forms of hard disk imaging are illegal. In the case where a pirate copies data from one PC hard drive to another to illegally run the software on two PCs, Product Activation stops that by forcing the copied software to be reactivated. It does so by comparing the hardware on which it was activated to the hardware on which it is now being booted. If the hardware is substantially different, then reactivation is required. If it is the same or similar, then the software will continue to work. Those who upgrade their PC's hardware substantially may be asked to reactivate. Reactivation for this reason is easy and can be completed by contacting Microsoft to obtain another confirmation ID.
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