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Delphi


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#1
SEBlake

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Getting ready to get back into programming. Studied .NET - thinking it is the direction I needed to go. Then I discovered it cannot be compiled. I have thousands of LOC in Pascal. Thus, Delphi.

Anyone working in Delphi?

< Steve >
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#2
ricci

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Hi Steve,

I guess there's not a lot of people working in Delphi, since you haven't had a response yet...

.NET code is actually compiled to native machine language (at runtime), unlike java that is compiled to virtual machine language. You're probably refering to the fact that when you tell the compiler to build your project it only produces IL, but you may not have considered that fact that the just-in-time compiling is pretty effective. You get a small performance hit (fractions of a second, normally) any time a code path is executed for the first time as the JIT compiler compiles that path. Every time after that, however, it runs really fast because the JIT does not run again, and the JIT compiles the IL into native machine language.

-Ricci
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#3
SEBlake

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Ricci,

Thanks for the response!

Uhhhh...what is IL? And not sure what the difference is between machine code and virtual machine code...

.NET compiles at runtime. Got it. I am talking about compiling my code separately. I want to be able to hand someone a notebook with my program(s) on it for them to use, but NOT for them to be able to copy it and put it on other boxes. It is easy to go to View->Source and cut-n-paste. Not so with compiled programs.

I have been out of it for a while. If I am missing something, by all means, hit meover the head with the brick!

< Steve >
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#4
ricci

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Steve,

what is IL?


IL stands for Intermediate Language, and it is what .NET code gets compiled to. At runtime, the JIT takes the IL and converts it to machine language.

not sure what the difference is between machine code and virtual machine code


Machine language is 1's and 0's executed by a machine's CPU. By virtual machine code, I was referring to the byte code generated by java compilers. This byte code is executed by the Java Virtual Machine, the same way machine language is executed by a machine's CPU.

.NET compiles at runtime. Got it.


.NET compiles to machine language at runtime. At compile time (when you tell the .NET compiler to compile), .NET compiles to IL, which is similiar to machine language except that some of your member variable and function names are visible in it. Your original source code, however, is not there.

It is easy to go to View->Source and cut-n-paste. Not so with compiled programs.


You can't just View-Source on a compiled .NET program. The best you can do is view it in the ILDasm.exe tool that Microsoft includes with the .NET SDK, and it's not the source that you're viewing. It's the equivalent of the assembly of a C++ program, where assembly is machine language using human readable operators instead of 1's and 0's. You still have to be pretty savy to know what the code is doing.

That said, it is still a concern. If .NET is not the way for you, then I hope you find what you need with Delphi.

Good Luck,
Ricci
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