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Monitor Cable


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#1
scrolljoe

scrolljoe

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Greetings ...Happy New Year to all.

I am doing some research on CRT Monitor and am curious as to what is the purpose of the bulged portion about 3/4 of an inch in diameter of the monitor's 15 pin Din cable .... Is there some crossing of the wires ? Thanks for any reponse.
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#2
Jack123

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Monitor Cable Info
3rd Jan 2006

This is where the [Ferrite Beads] – are housed – The are used for [EMI/RFI Control] – The [Transition Ferrules/solder sleeves] may also be housed there – They are used to transform the [75 Ohm Co-axial Video Cable] into stranded wire pairs for soldering connection -

A ferrite bead has the property of eliminating the broadcast signals. Essentially, it "chokes" the RFI transmission at that point on the cable -- this is why you find the beads at the ends of the cables. Instead of traveling down the cable and transmitting, the RFI signals turn into heat in the bead.
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Computers are fairly noisy devices. The motherboard inside the computer's case has an oscillator that is running at anywhere from 300 MHz to 1,000 MHz. The keyboard has its own processor and oscillator as well. The video card has its own oscillators to drive the monitor. These oscillators are [Noise Generators] and have the potential to broadcast radio signals. This interference is usually eliminated by the cases around the motherboard and keyboard.

Another source of noise is the cables connecting the devices. These cables act as nice, long antennae for the signals they carry. The signals they broadcast can interfere with radios and TVs. The cables can also receive signals and transmit them into the case, and cause problems.


Reference -
http://computer.hows...question352.htm

Jack123

Edited by Jack123, 03 January 2006 - 10:16 AM.

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#3
scrolljoe

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Thanks Jack123 for the reply...found same very informative. Thanks again.
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