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Upgrading Motherboard


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#1
NateM

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Hello GeeksToGo. My problem is my motherboard. The Dell Dimension 4500 motherboard's graphics card slot is an AGP. As most know, PCI-E is becoming the best and most popular slot for graphics cards. My GeForce 6800 GS I ordered just came in, and due to not researching enough information about the graphics card itself and my motherboard, I am stuck with a PCI-E graphics card that I can't use due to my motherboard's AGP slot.

This was my own fault for not knowing enough about my computer and the slots graphics cards use, but I think it's about time I upgrade the motherboard anyway. AGP will probably be obsolete before long, so I'll just upgrade my motherboard now instead of having to do it eventually further down the line.

I've been looking around on Newegg and this is the motherboard I found that would probably be best suited for me without spending a ton of money: http://www.newegg.co...N82E16813130503

After researching a bit more, this motherboard, as well as most others I looked at, have a Socket T (LGA 775) CPU socket. My processor is a Pentium 4, so I assumed it'd be compatible as it says LGA 775 is for Pentium 4 processors. However, I was reading up on Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_t ) and noticed that the LGA 775 supports Intel Pentium 4 (2.66 - 3.800 GHz). My processor is a 2 GHz Pentium 4.

There lies one of my questions. The LGA 775 wouldn't work with my processor, would it? If no, I'm in a dilemma. I don't want to send back this graphics card and get a AGP; I want to upgrade my motherboard. It needs a PCI-E slot, at least 3 PCI slots, and a CPU socket for a Pentium 4 2 GHz (I think this is Socket 468, refer to that Wikipedia link above).

I would really appreciate some help and will be researching this myself more, but professional help would be great.

Edited by NateM, 03 January 2006 - 04:52 PM.

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#2
Samm

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Welcome to G2G

You are right I'm afraid, the processor in your system is a 478 socket P4, so it won't fit in a LGA775 socket motherboard.
You could buy a socket 478 motherboard but I'm not sure you can get one with a pci express socket, so that isn't much help!

The other consideration if you do decide to change the motherboard, is that you may require a new case as well. Dell often use slightly non-standard cases which ordinary boards won't fit in.

You may find in fact, that your best option is to sell your current system as it is & buy a new PC that has a PCI Express slot.
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#3
SlackerX

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Don't forget about the memory, it will almost certainly be different for a socket 775 motherboard too, but you have a point about the case. That is why I would never buy a Dell (or gateway, or HP) or other branded machine, they never use spec parts. Also, I know on the socket 775 mobo in my wifes machine, keep in min it has only ONE onboard IDE controller (a fact that escaped me when I ordered it for her) therefore I ended up having to get an external IDE controller so that she could also use her DVD drive.
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#4
shard92

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Another possible problem when looking to upgrade a dell. Many dell's use proprietary power supplies. They are pinned differently even though they will fit in a standard board. I have heard some of the newer dells are going back to standard but I'm not sure how you'd know for sure... last I knew dell said yes all are proprietary even though some are not.

I agree with samm your best bet is to get a whole knew computer...

Oh and as an affterthought you might have trouble with windows running anyway... you might have to buy a new windows as well.
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#5
Samm

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shard92 makes a good point there about the PSU.
The majority of Dell tower systems do in fact now use fairly standard PSUs (as far as the main ATX connect & the molex connectors are concerned) but that has not always been the case & I certainly wouldn't guarantee that all the newer Dell systems do this.

My advice to anyone out there who is considering using a Dell PSU with a non-Dell motherboard (or vice versa) should check the voltages on each of the ATX connector pins first to make sure they are standard.

Another thing you find with some Dell systems is that as well as the main 20 pin ATX connector, some of their motherboards also utilize an auxilary power connector, which the majority of normal PSUs don't have.
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