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Raid Array VS High Perfomance disk


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#1
comanighttrain

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Hey guys, i want to up the speed of my disks, what is the better way of doing this? I can either get a SATA drive, SCSI drive or set up a raid array(i believe which can be either SATA or E-IDE)?
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#2
warriorscot

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Well, what drives do you have now, SCSI are the fastest drives you can get, overkill for most folks though, RAID is good but its performance gain isnt much better than just having two drives and carefully managing them so you read from one and write to another, RAID also poses the risk of complete and total data loss in a striped array if it collapses from any corruption from either disk or a failure of one.

For most the best idea is to leave it as it is, to gain a performance boost more ram is a better idea as it means you need to access the hard drive less.
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#3
comanighttrain

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I already have 2 gigs of ram:P.

Well i was gonna buy two small seagate drives and RAID them just for games. Since its gonna be a while before i go 64 bit (since i just got a top end AGP graphics card).
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#4
warriorscot

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Wont make alot of difference, the only difference you see is in load times at best you will cut ten seconds off and its not worth the price, and you can cut more buy just geting a really good big HD two small ones arent going to help much and cost you more. Depends on the PC do you have, SATAII support will determine the biggest amount of speed improvemnet, if you just have SATAI support than not much point.

I would get a samsung spinpoint P120 if you want a big improvement as far as i know its still the fastest drive you can get in SATAII short of the 15000rpm atlas drives.
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#5
dsenette

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people are having alot of misconceptions about RAID lately....it's major advantage is data integrity and fault tollerance.....it may offer some slight speed increases..but those increases are generally due to the fact that people usually use SATA or SCSI drives to construct the raid array..in which case your speed is coming from the drive..not the RAID configuration.....it may seem that RAID would logically speed up the transfer of data..but you have to take into account the overhead placed on the data transfer by the RAID controller....in any form of raid...the controller has to issue the command twice...so...it's not gonna help speed anything up much
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#6
Kemasa

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Could you please explain this:

"RAID also poses the risk of complete and total data loss in a striped array if it collapses from any corruption from either disk or a failure of one."

The concept of RAID is such that you can lose a drive and not lose data, with the exception being RAID0, which is really AID0 as there is no Redundant in it.

You will gain a speed increase with RAID, in some cases huge, IF you use a hardware RAID device and IF you can support the data transfer speed. If you use software RAID, then often you will lose performance since the system has to do multiple writes. Part of the speed increase depends on how you do it, how many disks, how you setup the RAID configuration, etc. and for the most part that means expense.

One thing that you might not realize is that when you add a hardware RAID controller you are increasing the processing power to the overall system, which also means that you have another processor writing the data.

Realize that I am talking in the general case, with machines that can handle the data transfer rates. PC based systems can have limitations which prevent any noticable gain.
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#7
dsenette

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i agree with most of what you said kemesa...especially the last part...most home users will not see anything noticable with a raid configuration in their system...and 9 times out of 10...it's a bigger headache than neccessary..
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