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Windows XP OEM or Retail


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#1
CGlase7

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Right now I am running a pirated copy of Windows XP Professional. I need to get a legal copy so I can get updates such as Service Pack 2. Should I purchase an OEM copy or a retail copy? The OEM is a lot cheaper, but is it just as good. Can I still get Microsoft updates with an OEM copy?
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#2
DeSade

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I am not sure if its the same where you are but where I am you can only buy a OEM copy of any software with a new computer.
Although its more expensive buying retail, obtaining OEM without buying the computer is just another form of pirating.

I would suggest you go and buy your copy retail. Its very easy to add to the pirating problem but it takes a real sense of fairplay to pay a little more and get it retail.

However with that said, there is no difference usually, OEM and Retail are essentially the same product just without the flashy box.

Edited by DeSade, 07 February 2006 - 11:14 PM.

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#3
SRX660

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SO, i am a pirate now because i buy multiple OEM cd's off ebay and from other companys for $60 each. Get a grip here because if you knew what OEM manufacturers pay you would not be happy. Do you think they could sell their computers for so cheap if the OS had cost them $130. I have already switched half my computers over to linux just because i get a lot more for my money than Windows offers. Lets see, i seem to remember when the government thought Microsoft was getting a bit too monopolistic When they were trying to make everyone run Internet Explorer and no other browser for internet access. I build a new computer every month just for fun. I usually sell off the oldest puter to recoup some of the expense. I get about half my money back for these 6 months old machines. I am not eligible for oem cd's from microsoft so i get them where i can. Guess i'll alwyas be a pirate then.

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#4
DeSade

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As you can see CGlase7 there are some strong views on this issue.

I am not going to say any more on this topic.
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#5
ricangeek

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Buy Retail believe me
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#6
creepysound

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When you purchase Microsoft Windows OEM version, Microsoft requires that the seller/business only sells it to you if you purchase along with it either a Fully Assembled computer which according to the microsoft agreement has A CPU, Motherboard, Hard Drive, Power Supply & Case. OR you purchase the OEM OS along with a non-peripheral computer hardware component in the same transaction. Now thats according to the Microsoft Agreement For the SELLER. it is up to the Seller to abide by the agreement, and not the buyer. Buyers purcahse OEM Windows from Sellers all the time that do not abide by the microsoft agreement. That does not make your software Illegal, it is the business you bought it from that did not follow through.

That being said, the OEM software works the same as retail, it just doesnt contain a retail box, just like all OEM vs Retail Products. :tazz:

Edited by creepysound, 08 February 2006 - 11:49 AM.

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#7
ricangeek

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Ok I' keep reading that OEM is the same as Retail-But no box, I bought an OEM WINXPprof.
and now I' can't add SP2 but thats ok cuz I' hate SP2 anyway, it will not recognize my sound card and my graphic card its set to a 600x...resolution with no ability to change it...so I've had to download drivers for
these cards and I just know(gueesing) that had I bought a retail I' would have had any of these problems.

OEM is what the company (Micro...) uses at the factory, retail is for all computers old or new that can run it.


Also make sure its full install, not upgrades that you buy (DuHH).
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#8
gerryf

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Just to clarify...

OEM and Windows Retail are identical in virtually every way. In order to buy an OEM version you must buy either a new machine or purchase it with hardware. Microsoft works out arrangements with retailers who sell OEM versions requiring they sell OEM versions only with hardware. This has traditionally means significant hardware that can constitute making a PC a new machine. Example, motherboard, harddrive.

In the past, retailers have used loopholes in the contract to sell OEM versions with as little as a cd-rom audio cable for .96 cents. Microsoft was cracking down on some of these guys last year...I do not know what the status is now.

For the end user, the key difference is that Microsoft does not support OEM software, ala, answering questions, sending out replacement CDs if one is lost or stolen.

You are entitled to every patch, critical or otherwise with OEM versions.

I cannot speak to ricangeek's issues, but they are not related to the fact he has an OEM version.

I have 3 OEM XP boxes at this moment, all up to date and working flawlessly, and 1 retail--also working flawlessly and up to date. (I also have a windows upgrade CD laying around)

The only issue that I can come up with that has any relevence is that cd-keys must match the version (out of the box--one can actually alter a string in the setupp.ini file to enable other keys if you are in a pinch)
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#9
dsenette

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SRX...i have to make a comment here because of yours...no one here called you a pirate....no one here personally attacked you..or your practices.....why did you feel a need to respond so aggressively to someone stating a fact about software licensing...that wasn't directed at you in any way? please check your tone when posting on the forums
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#10
Neil Jones

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The other thing to be aware of is your ability to transfer the licence key that you get with XP.

With a Retail licence, you can transfer it to a new computer with no issues, providing its uninstalled from the old one first. It isn't tied to any particular system.

With an OEM licence, your licence lives and dies with the PC it first meets and that's the end of the matter. That means that you should be buying a new XP every time that OEM system dies. Some people have been known to transfer licences in this fashion, a practice which is totally understandable but wrong in Microsoft's eyes.

Plus of course OEM support is limited to the people you buy it from, whereas Retail isn't. In both cases there is however nothing ever to stop you seeking help on the internet and forums like this, it just basically means with an OEM licence, Microsoft won't help you.

As for differences between Retail and OEM - there aren't any, apart from the acceptance of the licence key which is dependent on the type of licence you have - OEM keys don't work with Retail disks and vice-versa.

The cheaper retail version - the upgrade - requires proof of an existing Windows installation or CD as well before it'll install. The OEM version won't. You can buy a retail edition which doesn't ask for proof of previous Windows, though it costs twice as much again, but you do get freedom to transfer the licence as you see fit.
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#11
wannabe1

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And to put all this in a smaller bucket for quicker consumption...

Get the retail version. The license will belong to you to use on any machine you have (one only at a time) for as long as you desire to use it. The OEM license dies with the machine it is originally installed on.

wannabe1

Edited by wannabe1, 08 February 2006 - 04:56 PM.

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#12
ricangeek

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After reading everybody's post regarding this question: retail or OEM I' have to say that I' agree with
all of you and will not say more about it unless ask...however I wish I' had bought Retail and I'm willing to sell my OEM version / Key and all for 100, my email is not private look it up I' do not know if I can say such things in here but if not I' will stop if told to do so...Plus please forgive my english grammer it is not my primary language anybody that want to correct my spelling can do so..CZ botton line to the person that started the post is buy retail but its a free country...jeje
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