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Network User Security from administrator intrusion


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#1
bamabanker

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I am a user on a Windows network and am concerned that my administrator is accessing my personal document files, email, and also remoting in on my desktop and actually watching my screen from time to time without my knowledge. Is there a way for me to detect this and prove it? If I need to install a program to do this I would appreciate any suggestions.

My email is Microsoft Outlook 2003 and I am operating under a terminal server connection. That is how the administrator can view my files and email.

Any suggestions for catching them?
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#2
Fenor

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If it is your administrator doing this and this computer is at work, then your employer has every right to check what you are doing on their computer. If you are not doing anything that is not allowed by your company, then you have nothing to worry about. They have their job to do and you have yours. Just do your job and all will be fine.

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#3
bamabanker

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Thanks for the sermon. I'm the President of the company. They work for me. Now do you understand?
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#4
Fenor

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Then fire them if you're the president.

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#5
bamabanker

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It's much more complicated than that. I have to have the evidence first. Can you help or not?
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#6
Kat

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Hello and welcome to GeeksToGo. I apologize for any misunderstandings here. I would just like to say that it really is impossible for us to know that you are indeed the President of the bank. Does that make sense? You could be Joe Schmoe working there, trying to hide p0rn or something. (please don't take offense, none is intended).

We are unable to give you help as to how to STOP this person, for just that reason. However...I am talking to various staff members, trying to figure out a way that we can help you CATCH them. :tazz: I'm not sure myself how to go about this, but if there's a way, we'll post it.
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#7
Fenor

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Well I've talked to some other tech's here and I will apologize for being rude. One thing we have come up with is you could hire an outside firm to do an audit. Of course this depends on the size of your company. I'll post more ideas as they come about.

Fenor

*Edit* Of course this is just a suggestion and not any type of legal advice on the matter. What you do is up to you, I am just giving you some ideas on avenues you can take.

Edited by Fenor, 14 February 2006 - 09:16 PM.

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#8
bamabanker

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Thank you. No offense taken. I'm just in a very precarious situation. It's not as much the primary administrator that I'm concerned about but another officer in the operations area that has administrator priviledges.

I completely understand and appreciate your concern for helping someone who may try to disguise theirselves in a situation such as this for their own dishonest benefit. This is for real.

I'm having an IT audit done in the next month by an outside firm. I'm concerned about the administrator covering their tracks, deleting logs, etc. which would not show up in the audit. I know just enough about computers to be dangerous. No more.

Any suggestions to help catch them would be welcomed.

Thank you.
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#9
Fenor

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Make it a private audit so that your administrator doesn't have a chance to cover his tracks. If he doesn't know the date of the audit he isn't going to be prepared for it and there might be some evidence he forgot to get rid of.

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#10
bamabanker

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Unfortunately, the officer is over the IT area and will be the main person coordinating with the audit firm. This type audit is a basic requirement for us and has been planned prior to my having these concerns.
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#11
Fenor

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I really have no way for you to check this. Hopefully someone else will be able to chime in with other ideas.

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#12
bamabanker

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Thanks. I appreciate your suggestions. If anything else comes to mind please let me know.
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#13
bamabanker

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Please don't let this question die. If anyone out there can help, please reply.
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#14
Kat

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Not many of our Staff members are online right now. If anyone has an answer for you as they log on and check the forums, they'll post a reply :tazz:
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#15
dsenette

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some of the guys may disagree with me here but..i'm an IS administrator myself...and well you need to review any of yur it policies and check the wording as every company's policy is different...but...in generall any and all data on a corporate network is owned by the company...not the user...the IS department leader/manager/whatever is the controller of this data and thereby has all legal right's to it's ownership and control....i have the right to look at any data on my network..no matter how sensative it is...president's computer (not gonna help...it's all in japanese) or accounting computer...doesn't matter...it's "my data" therefore i can review it...now...the fun part comes into what i can and cannot do with that information...i am not allowed to disimenate this data..sell it...give it to anyone who doesn't already have access to it...etc... so your way in on t his administrator...is what he's doing with the data after looking at it....and also...why he's looking at it to begin with....we as administrators have a right (as long as it's in our it policy) to "spy" on anyone in the company's computer if we supsect anything....that's our job...

of course...with all this said...this is all determined by the wording of your IT policy...so check that out

also...while we can't help you block the guy from looking at your stuff....i would get a random audit done..but have them come in saying they are an accounting frim (it is tax season you know)...and have one of their guys watch your machine....if this guy is trying to get sensative information....then he would probably try his hardest to spy on you during a tax audit...any security analyst worth a grain of salt would be able to do simple tracking on a single network pc without interaction with your IS department
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