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overclocking... programs and tutorials?


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#1
torahtrance

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I tried to overclock my friends system the other day but ran into a lot of problems. I am wondering what is used to overclock newer systems, and older systems. I am assuming it is not done directly from the bios in all cases. I tried to take my friends 2.4ghz celeron up a bit and the system would not load up when I would raise it up. The bus works at 100/33 normally. If I try to bump it up to lets say 133/66 it doesnt work! Luckily his mobo is the asus p4sgx-mx which auto resets the cpu settings if it fails.

so in order to help me know beforehand how to calculate and what programs to use I need to read some tutorials that give the real meat of the info. I see a lot or article where they talk about overclocking, show some pretty stats and thats about it...

thanks for the help as always! :tazz:
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#2
mcpscomp

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Personaly ,I've never been a over clock fan. Did alot with old system by using jumpers back then and see not much of improvements but it was back then when them CPU were so expensive and run alot cooler. For todays world, I dont see any benefit.
1-It 's so cheap to get a higher speed CPU.
2-Nerver see much of improvement when over clock by using windows
program
3-See some what improvement when using bios feature but CPU poping like pop corn and inrisk of burn out CPU since all the newer CPU run already hot.
Sorry but that is just my own opinion.
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#3
warriorscot

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Well try and avoid opinions facts are always nicer.

CPUS in relative terms arent cheap in fact they are very expensive pieces of hardware and its not neccesarily true you can get faster for cheaper, look at the athlon xps, they are no longer produced but they were popular and home users looking to upgrade are paying premium price for the cpus more than they would have done at the time in some cases.

Overclocking on older systems is generally mutch more difficult, most high end quality motherboards are designed to be overclockable to some degree which previously wasnt a design goal if it did it was nice now its a requirement. Generally you would overclock in Bios many bioses now have an overclocking menu and alot of the NF4 boards have automatic overclocking features, the most limiting factor on a new pc is usually ram timings being too tight and not able to reach the same speeds as the chipset.

Overclocking on intel cpus should never be done without a good cooler, you can get away with the stock on the newer AMDs as they run cool even at high speeds.

You can overclock using a windows program like clockgen some find it easier but they dont give you the same level of control as bios but its quicker and easier.

You can gain a significant amount of performance from overclocking, i can get almost a full Ghz extra on my cpu and even a small overclock you notice a big difference on it, but effects are dependant on the rest of the system, if your CPU is your biggest bottleneck then itll be significant if its your RAM or GPU as it was in older systems the boost will be marginal.

Ild just leave a celeron alone for overclocking its not the cpu for it, but if its an unused system experiment with it just dont expect anything or be upset if you break it.

Overclocking is still dangerous if not done properly, you need to start with an idea of the parameters of the chip and what its capable of, if you go above this to much dont be surprised if it dies, we have a small overclocking thread in the guides forum it has links to some good sites i think, lots of great overclocking specific websites where you can find not only everything you want to know about computers and overclocking but everything you didnt.
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#4
comanighttrain

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Over clocking a celeron is like tweaking a tractor. Its a good work horse but itll never go fast. If you really need to speed up the system i guess your only option is biting the bullet and buying a new CPU. The good news is there are plenty of older pentiums you could probobly get for reasonable prices that over clock well.

Before you whip out the wallet tho, what kinda ram are you using? and what mobo?

Dave
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#5
torahtrance

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well its all good cause this computer is old (obviously if its a p4 2.4 celeron northwood!) and my friend already ordered a whole new slew of stuff based on recommendations from this site :tazz: So we are just waiting for the guy to bring them over to Israel he is stuck in Toronto now for a few more weeks.. In the meantime we wanted to play around with the system!

heheh I have already destroyed one Dimm of 256 ram and the crappy inno3d fx5200 card had a broken fan, but i wanted to try overclocking anyways... Burnt that out in 5 minutes as well :)

now its got 256mb ram minus 16m for onboard shared video....
hehehe
whatever its just a few weeks till the awesome PC comes in :)

i'm gonna check out those guides u mentioned!

thanks guys
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