Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

computer crashes and games crash to desktop


  • Please log in to reply

#61
gerryf

gerryf

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 11,365 posts
yes, that is an old power supply for a pre-pentium60 style motherboard

It's probably 80 watts or something...and would not work even if it had the right connection

Please note you are now slightly overvolting your motherboard/cpu...make very certain you have good cooling...you might even try reducing the voltage to 7 or 5 percent
  • 0

Advertisements


#62
jasonhnf

jasonhnf

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts
Okay so i played the game that usually crashes on me for a bit and it never crashed once! and i installed sims 2 okay no problem and played it for about an hours and it was running just fine too... no crashing to the desktop! normally sims 2 would crash 5 to 15mins into the game... and also the dvd player program that came with my drive would always crash after 5mins of playing... i was able to watch a dvd for over an hour without it crashing! i think this might of solved the problem... i'm going to change it down to 7 percent to back off a bit and check on the temps every now and then for the next few weeks to see if its getting too hot in there... thank you so much again for your help and hopefully i won't have to come back into this thread with another reporting of an error... you guys rock so much for helping me out... its not even your job and i'm not paying you guys yet you did it for me as a favor.. that really means a lot! :tazz: thanks!

Edited by jasonhnf, 24 February 2006 - 04:30 PM.

  • 0

#63
gerryf

gerryf

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 11,365 posts
Great news!

Just a note, Skeptic's point remains valid...your issue may still be the power supply cannot supply a sustained level of power...we cheated by boosting the the vcore a tad

If things work for a while and then start erroring again, I'd seriously consider a new power supply since this one may be degrading
  • 0

#64
jasonhnf

jasonhnf

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts
yeah i think i'm ganna save up a bit and get a new one... cause clearly it must of been a power supply issue becuase of what was tweaked... thanks again :tazz:
  • 0

#65
gerryf

gerryf

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 11,365 posts
It may be the power supply, but it could also be a slightly wonky capacitor

it is interesting to me that another person with this exact motherboard I found in a usenet posting was having a similar issue in which a similar solution addressed it.

Now, that is only 2 out of several thousand motherboards they mad, but I wonder if gigabyte didn't have a bad batch.

Certainly, if stability is an issue at 7 or 5 percent is an issue, 10 percent is within spec, so I would not worry about it, but the closer to normal vcore you are the better.

10 percent is not something to freak about. Peope overvolt the vcore all the time, but usually overvolting makes things LESS stable, not more so
  • 0

#66
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
Just one last note from my side: You must be very careful with the old psu. The two connectors to the motherboard must be installed in such a way that the ground wires (black) face each other at the center. If you make a mistake at this point you can fry your motherboard in an instant.

I don't know what is the wattage of this old psu but I would never try to get more power by increasing voltage. This can overheat components and shorten their life considerably. A new, generic, psu, rated at 450-500W, cost where I live about 20$. If you can afford this money you may save yourself a lot on future expenses by buying a new one.

And last: PSUs are a major source of all kind of problems. A problem there can destabilize the entire system in ways which are often difficult to relate to the psu.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP