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#1
ankush patel

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hey,

I just got to work and i found one of my workers has left a site that she wansnt supposed to be on, on the screen,

is there any way of me finding out when she accesed this?

I want the exact time.
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#2
dsenette

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open the history, then right click on the page in the history, click properties...there should be a "last visited entry"...if you don't see properties...it may say expand...if so..choose that...then right click again on what comes up under it..and do properties (i'm using i.e. 7 so it may be different
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#3
gerryf

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in ie, click the history icon, find the site in the history view, right click, choose properties--see last visited
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#4
ankush patel

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thanks,

ye i just fired her!!!!


thanks
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#5
dsenette

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heheh sweet!
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#6
gerryf

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well, that seems a bit extreme
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#7
dsenette

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we've got a very similar policy here at work..(i wrote it that way at least) you get one warning..that warning is your internet access is revoked for 6 months..without discussion...after 6 months..you do it again..and...seeee ya
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#8
gerryf

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well, that seems a bit extreme


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#9
dsenette

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i like administrating TO THE EXTREME *air guitar riff*
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#10
ankush patel

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well i own a grocery store, and there is no reason on going to sites such as myspace or stuff like that.

warning or no warning.

also some of the stuff i saw on her myspace was terrible, thank god she is gone
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#11
dsenette

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i agree with you on that stuff...too many people in work environments assume that internet access is part of the job....it's not..it's a luxury..and rules must be followed.
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#12
gerryf

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Some people need to spend a little more time as an employee before they are promted to management

my opinion....take it or leave it for what it is worth
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#13
dsenette

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my last comment on the subject...(because i deffinitely do not want to get into an arguement with you gerry...respect you waaaayyyy too much for that)....

if people were able to be trusted...then the rules (and subsequent consequences) wouldn't need to be so harsh...but MANY people in most busness environments cannot be trusted in respect to internet usage...in my office...we've got a rather open floor plan...open cubicles..we can see all the monitors all the time...had two guys surfing some HEAVY pron...in the middle of the day..not after hours..not on a saturday....in the middle of the day with an office full of people...many of whom are women...the legal reprecussions of one of those women seeing the sites that these two idiots were looking at in the middle of the day on a network that they do not own...far outweighed the severity of punishment they recieved
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#14
ankush patel

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the fact of the matter is that WORK especially for me becuase i own a grocery store, there is no reason to be going on sites such as myspace.

all that should be done at home.
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#15
gerryf

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well, I don't really care to get in an argument with you guys... I understand and appreciate the need for policies and the concern over lost productivity resulting from employees surfing the net on company time. I also do not know the exact situations you are facing.

But my general response is there is a difference between surfing a porn site in an office full of women, and your stated policy, which allows for all kinds of arbitrary decisions, not just by you, but by those who come after you. It also allows for expansion later.

Second, the argument that things need to be done at home....ok, not a problem. I also agree with that. This is the argument that employees are "stealing" from employers by using company time and company resources to surf the net, etc

I get that.

I wonder, however, how many companies ever consider how much time they steal from employees?

Productivty has increased exponentially as employees work harder and longer, and get paid the same or slightly more. People are not machines. They cannot work blindly on a task without a mental break...if that means a quick check into their fantasy baseball yahoo league then I've got no issues with that.

Dictatorial, blanket policies lead to poor morale, decreased productivty, employee turnover, high training costs, etc.

They make management's job easier because then managers do not have to think or work to alter behavior in a positive constructive way. It is an exercise in management power.

I have been on both sides of the fence, employee and employer. As an employer, I have gotten more productivity out of less resources then colleagues exactly because I always strive to remember what it is like to be an employee.

A fired employee is a failure by management, and should be recognized as such. You spend a great deal of time training these people, and these people also are part of the family of staffers

You send a message when you fire someone like this--are you certain you sent the right message?

I'm not talking about what message you think you sent--I'm talking about what message your employees received.

In a poor economy, you've got folks over a barrel, but when the economy improves, your ability to retain employees will be an issue for you.

Employees are an asset. It's shameful that too many businesses fail to remember that (generalization, not meant to imply either of you). It's very likely these were bad employees and needed to be shown the door. I get that. Sometimes, it is necessary to let people go.

But, this is what disturbs me about the whole thing, though--both of you took satisfaction over the situation. That is very sad.

Last I will say on the topic. Good luck and if you have any further issues, please don't hesitate to post.
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