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reinstall OS/MB BIOS?


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#16
Johanna

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Let me make sure I understand correctly. You replaced a failed hard drive and put XP on it with what? The cd for your unassembled component machine? Or you still have your old hard drive to boot the comp and are using the new drive as an extra? XP disks are specific to the machine. Do you have SP2 installed?

A System File Check might solve the software install issues, but you will be prompted for your XP cd.
Start > Run > cmd
sfc /scannow
note the space when you type.

sfc - system file checker, retrieves the correct version of the file from %Systemroot%\System32\Dllcache or the Windows installation source files, and then replaces the incorrect file.

If you want to see what was replaced, right click My Computer > manage, expand event viewer > system.

System File Checker (sfc)
Scans and verifies the versions of all protected system files after you restart your computer.

Johanna
My late husband was a Marine 1968-1971 but they say there is no such thing as an ex-Marine, just a dead one. He was one of the most polite people I have ever met, and also the fiercest. ;-)
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#17
wannabe1

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I, too, would be very interested in knowing which cd you installed XP from. Some OEM cd's will automatically create a hidden partition just about the size of your missing space...this is used for recovery information. It will not show in Disk Management, but we may be able to check for it using a Win98 startup disk (providing you have a floppy drive on board).

Edited by wannabe1, 01 March 2006 - 12:19 AM.

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#18
LthrnckPA

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Let me make sure I understand correctly. You replaced a failed hard drive and put XP on it with what? The cd for your unassembled component machine? Yep. The old drive had a bad boot sector so my wife treated me to the 160G for Valentine's Day. I originally used my component PC's disk to install XP. But when I couldn't load WordPerfect or Roxio on my PC and could load them on her laptop I tried to reformat using her laptop's XP disk.

Or you still have your old hard drive to boot the comp and are using the new drive as an extra? XP disks are specific to the machine. No, I'm booting from my C drive just fine, other than the "phantom" section. I still have the old 40G HD but I can't seem to get anything from it so it's just sitting in a drawer in anti-static wrap. Both the laptop and my PC are currently running fine off the XP disk from Cindy's laptop.

Do you have SP2 installed? Yes, I have gone to MS and exhausted their entire list of critical and not so critical updates for XP, including SP2 (so presumably SP1 as well). I'm learning a bunch from both GeekU and from forums like this.

I'm sorry he's your late husband, but it is nice to see you are apparently as proud of it as he was. Semper Fi, Johanna.
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#19
LthrnckPA

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Some OEM cd's will automatically create a hidden partition just about the size of your missing space...this is used for recovery information. You mean to tell me that Cindy's Gateway XP disk could be deliberately hiding 11G of my HD? So if I want it back, I have to try a clean install from my own XP disk? Or can I maybe partition the HD and then re-designate that portion somehow? Don't laugh, I have no idea if what I am saying makes any sense even, but just sort of brain storming.

It will not show in Disk Management, but we may be able to check for it using a Win98 startup disk (providing you have a floppy drive on board). LOL(WR), as a matter of fact, I do. When the internal stopped working I never gave it a thought until these problems started. Then Seagate told me I needed a floppy to create a boot disk with their Disk Manager software on it. So this weekend I bought an external and hooked it up. Obviously SG's DM did not solve the problem.
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#20
wannabe1

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Ok...we have a couple of issues working against us here. The first is this...The XP now installed on your machine is considered "Pirated" which not only makes it illegal, but the G2G Terms of Service will prevent us from assisting you with that OS. However, if you format and install XP using your Retail version of XP, you will be legal once again.

That being said, your missing disk space is almost certainly a hidden partition created by the Gateway Recovery CD. Formatting and reinstalling your retail operating system would cure that issue. With a 160 gig drive, you may well end up with some "Unallocated" space at the end of the drive, but that can be reclaimed as described earlier.

For future reference, when you do build your "component machine" you will need to purchase a new copy of Windows XP...or...wait for Vista later this year.

wannabe1
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#21
LthrnckPA

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For future reference, when you do build your "component machine" you will need to purchase a new copy of Windows XP...or...wait for Vista later this year.

The main reason I am trying to regain the space is to begin learning Linux. I was thinking about 80G for XP and it's stuff, 40G for archiving my CD's, and 40G to play with Linux.

What's the scoop on these sealed OS's sold at the computer shows for like $50? Are they pirated too? I'm in law enforcement, so I really don't care for illegal activities.

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#22
LthrnckPA

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And besides, how can it be pirated? I paid for the OS when I bought her laptop, just like I paid for the other OS when I bought my PC. It's not like I went to Kazaaa or borrowed my buddies.
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#23
wannabe1

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Believe me...you are not alone in how you understand what's legal and what's not. Microsoft's EULA (End User License Agreement) basically states "One XP installation per license purchased". When you purchased the laptop, you purchased the license for that operating system on that machine. To install it on your machine while it is still installed on the laptop violates the license agreement and makes the second installation a pirated installation. You also own the license on your retail version to install on any one machine of your choice.

As for the discounted XP you see at trade fairs and such, if you look closely you will see that most of these are OEM versions and are purchased along with a volume license which allows them to be distributed rather inexpensively. It looks like a good deal, but experience has shown that these disks often lead to problems down the road. It's a case of "Buyer Beware".

Did that help or are you now as confused as I am? :tazz:

wannabe1

Edited by wannabe1, 01 March 2006 - 06:34 PM.

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#24
LthrnckPA

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So basically Bill Gates wants you to pay mega-bucks to run each computer in your household. Must have learned that one from his lawyers.

So the OEM's are lacking in some way, or written differently?

See, I "wannabe" one someday too. This stuff is entertaining to me. It's sort of like a big logic puzzle or a chess game.
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#25
wannabe1

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Here's the wannabe1 stripped down explanation on OEM vs Retail.

OEM version licensing is different in that the license stays with the machine it installed on. If you sell the machine, The license (and the operating system) go with it. Good deal, huh? If that ain't enough, Microsoft won't support the OEM version. If you need help or have a problem, Microsoft will not help you.

With the Retail Version license, the license is to you...not the machine. You may install it on any one machine of your choice. If you sell the machine it is on, you must remove the operating system, but you are then free to intall it on another machine of your choice. The license and the operating system stay with you. Plus...you have full support on this version for as long as Microsoft supports that product. (Windows 98 and ME will no longer be supported after the end of this month...longevity of support is pretty good).

See, I "wannabe" one someday too. This stuff is entertaining to me. It's sort of like a big logic puzzle or a chess game.

Better watch out...G2G very addictive...you might get hooked (if you aren't already). Join in Live Chat sometime...this site is like one big family!

Edited by wannabe1, 01 March 2006 - 07:23 PM.

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