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What an OS should really be


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#1
Tempest210

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I wish Microsoft would just make an OS that was stream lined and small, something that I could add to, and not full of “features” they think I need or want. Can you image how fast it would be without all the bloat? Just give me the essentials, desktop, networking, etc and let me pick my Media Player, my browser, my burning software, etc.

In XP, there is software to write files to a CD, un-zip files, and browse the net. But, like a lot of people, I never use them, I use Nero, I use Winzip, I use Firefox.
If I write a letter, I use OpenOffice, not wordpad. Anyone using Paint? And the list goes on and on, and how much of this is tied to the OS?

Just look at how Messenger is fixed to Outlook, and how IE6 is fixed to the OS, open a web page with it, then open a folder on your computer and click on Tools – Folder Options – View, then select Show hidden files and folders. Click OK and watch the Web page refresh. That doesn’t happen in Firefox.

Give me the platform and let me build on it. I will pick what’s important. And a small, tightly run OS would be screaming fast, and those clock cycles could be used to make games run faster too.

Now that would be innovation.
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#2
Mr.Chow

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But you see Mircosoft has a collar on eevrything. They don't want you to have that kind of freedom. Microsoft wants full control. There software is used in almost every kind of computer imaginable. They are even used in New Electronic parking meters ... its pretty sad. Microsoft has a leash and collar on many things.
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#3
warriorscot

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Actually you can unsitall those things, or get versions of XP without them(lite).

Vista can crash down to a new version of DOS to play games it doesnt even have a GUI apparently in the games mode. Is having a handle on everything a bad thing should the worlds biggest and best software company be limited to only PC operating systems, they pay a huge salary bill to pay the worlds smartest people to code software it wouldnt be good business sense to have them all ironing out every tiny flaw in one piece of software rather than making new software.

Its not IE6 fixed to it its explorer they are linked together completely(ever noticed you can open an explorer window and browse the web) you dont have to use IE6 if you use firefox as your default browser the only time IE ever needs to be used is updating windows manually and thats hardly something to complain about it would be like using IE to get firefox extensions.

I also use paint on occasion, i dont have wordpad but i use notepad every other day. Also windows CD burning and unzipping options are very limited they are just there as a backup to proper software.

Edited by warriorscot, 06 March 2006 - 09:49 AM.

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#4
admin

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Microsoft is very limited by legacy software, and hardware. They do develop new operating systems from scratch that never see the light of day, just as an exercise, and to push the boundaries of technology. In many ways the power of Microsoft's market share and success, limits what they are able to innovate and invent.

I'll give you this great operating system tomorrow. But you have to buy a new system, and all new software (email, music, games), plus learn how to use that new operating system and software. Also, this software wouldn't work with anything your friends have until they upgrade, ar any of your peripherals. Would you buy it?

Also, remember that a large share of software is used by businesses. Those businesses are focused on productivity. New innovations can't come at the expense of productivity because people have to relearn common tasks. Employment expenses are much greater than software.
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#5
winst0n

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I figure here is a good a place as any to discuss middle ground.
New computers can handle so much that a few extra bells and whistles can easily fit under the hood.
I've as yet run into nothing but frustration because of the myth of resource light linux's.
People would say, "with linux and old 486 can beat a PII on MS."
Well linux distros are as full of bells and whistles bloating them up as MS.
i gave up and went with win98 on the PI.
it couldn't handle linux because I didn't have enough disk space.
Never gotthru command line with debian ... what good is dos that's all weird and useless?
Linux users tend to customize considerably.
Stripping down to bare essentials.
But I guess you need to know how the pinto works before you can soup it up.

A lot of progress has been made in the realm of open source.

I dunno maybe if somebody started marketing mini-pcs that were specialized for games or something.
(wait a minute MS did that didn't they)

linux is for people who want to code.
Casual users can slowly work their way over using open source apps.

someone mentioned paint. It's pretty small.
I wonder if I can find an open source paint to fiddle with.
so much to learn .. so litttle time.
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#6
winst0n

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hmm dude is usin a 480 watt power supply for his 3200+ eh?
the box my k62 died in is an atx 350 watt ...
should i stick with sempron or would this 67 watt bad boy manage with a single hard drive and single video card?

Processor: AMD Athlon™ 64
Model Number: 3200+
Frequency (MHz): 2000
L2 Cache Size: 512KB
Socket: 939
Stepping: E6
Manufacturing Tech (CMOS): 90nm SOI
Wattage (W): 67
System Bus (MHz): 2000

If I do use the 350 should i stick to AGP?
anyone have a newish system running on 350?
I've burnt out about 3 power supplies and 3 motherboards.
NOT FUN!
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#7
SuperSam

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If you have noticed, firefox actually has an IE tab extension, which means you can ditch IE for, well just not use it.

I'm using an IE-Tab extension, which means I can do my windows updates in firefox, pretty neat.

Also, having those programs isn't going to make much of a difference on most modern computers. For gods sake I have an old Compaq Armada M700, its an extremely low spec system:

Pentium something (~300Mhz)
64MB Ram
4MB Graphics
10GB HDD.

Yeah, you get the idea, terrible. infact, It only started to get slow when I installed external applications SUCH AS FIREFOX. Theres not much your going to do with a laptop like that anyway, I was just using it to experiment. But for the regular home user, what comes on a Windows XP install is sufficient for most people.

As for microsoft, they have thier hands in a lot of companys and its unreal. I remember readin about it in a magazine, though I'm not sure what.

Winston, I also thought XP 3200+s and Athlon 3200+ were 2.2Ghz? not 2.0ghz...

Edited by SuperSam, 16 March 2006 - 05:36 PM.

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