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Graphic Card for laptop


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#1
pico90

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Hello, it's been a while since I needed the help of the helpful people of this website... but as your advice was greatly helpful in the past I come back to bother some more...

This time it doesn't have to do with hijacklogs, which I think it's a good thing because I know it must be a tough job. Anyways.

I recently bought a laptop, an hp dv1010us. Now, I don't know exactly which ports or things it has, but I know the graphic card it came with sucks, so now I'm trying to improve it by buying a better one and installing it, the thing is I have no idea which graphic cards can I buy that I can install to it. So if you could point me in the right direction I would appreciate it.

Thanks beforehand, a very troubled user as usual.
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#2
hrdwrjnkie

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Your first step should be to contact the manufacturer. Most laptops (actually all laptops, with a few exceptions) are unable to have the graphics card upgraded. The only place that should do this for you is HP. Most times, they are affixed to the motherboard, and an upgrade would near the cost of a new laptop.

Good luck, you may need it.
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#3
Master_Axe

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Hi, if you say affixed to the motherboard, you mean unremovable? I've taken my laptop entirely apart before, including the graphic card! Bad idea though, around a week later my screen started to turn almost pitch black (as though it were turned off, but if u opened it all the way(so the laptop was completely horizontal)), you could see it was sorta still on, just really dark, and weak. Does that have anything to do with the graphic card?

Yes, i'll find a question to about everything :tazz:

Thx

Franz
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#4
headhunter600

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Depending upon the setup you purchased, you have a builtin video card as previously suggested. You may be able to increase the ram it uses in your bios which will help with your video viewing. However it will take ram away from other usages.
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#5
Master_Axe

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yeah, but if my video card is removable, why shouldn't i be able to replace it with a better one? Or is it just a part, because i do only have one cooler in my laptop, and that is linked directly to the chip. thx

Franz
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#6
hrdwrjnkie

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yeah, but if my video card is removable, why shouldn't i be able to replace it with a better one? Or is it just a part, because i do only have one cooler in my laptop, and that is linked directly to the chip. thx

Franz

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It may very well be removable, however it is not designed to be a modular design like most desktop systems. Desktops today are all built around the ATX form-factor standard. There are some PC makers that use different standards than this, but they are highly-specialized market applications (network appliances, etc.).

The problem with laptops is that there is no predefined standard, so HP may make a different video card connector, for example, than Dell does. ALso, the consumer availablility of mobile video solutions is slim to none. GEnerally the vendors that sell such items work directly with the OEM such as Dell, HP, Gateway, and so on. Uless you are willing to buy these items in quantity, they will not deal with you.

This has just been my persoanl experience, and if you are determined to pull you new laptop apart and swap parts, you take the risk as you stated before of completely destroying a high-dollar system. Also, as a best-case scenario, you will end up with a machine that works but has no warranty. Should any other component in the machine fail during its warranty period, your manufacturer or warranty provider will refuse to honor any warranty due to the fact htat you have opened the casing.

There are some things that are very accessible for the home enthusiast, and there are some that are better left to the professional. As an individual user, you have to decide where that line is drawn. Asking questions regarding something is a great way to learn, but if you are desiring to pursue more technical endeavors, perhaps the official training should prefix that endeavor.

The way I see it your three options would be:

1. Locate a replacement part (expensive if not difficult) and replace it yourself, voiding any warranty in the process and risking destruction of your equipment.

2. Have some person or entity that is innately familiar with the design of your system do it for you (even more expensive and still voids warranty, though a trained individual is less likely to permanantly damage your machine).

3. Sell the laptop you currently own that does not meet your needs at fair market price, then take the $$ you would have spent upgrading along with the $$ you made selling it, and purchase a machine that suits your needs.

Personally, option 3 would be the way I would go. It all depends how much time, money, effort, and risk you want to put ito it. And if all goes well doing it yourself, you get that bonues pride of having accomplished something.

The choice is ultimately yours, however the members of this board have given you some great advice.
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#7
headhunter600

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yeah, but if my video card is removable, why shouldn't i be able to replace it with a better one? Or is it just a part, because i do only have one cooler in my laptop, and that is linked directly to the chip. thx

Franz

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As previously suggestion, laptops are completely different monsters when it comes to adding cards. You might be able to disable the onboard and add a card, who knows without more info. I would suggest contacting hp and ask them. Or post exactly what motherboard your laptop has, what graphic you have and maybe someone here will know.
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#8
Master_Axe

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Mmmm. thx. Just note that im not the one who made this thread ;). I just saw that video cards are affixed and thought "hmmmmmmm thats odd" and said i can take mine out :tazz:. The reason i did is because this computer can't be sold, and is going to be dead in about another half more year :thumbsup:. It weighs like 6 Kg, has 1Ghz, 32mb geforce2, 256ddr-ram. 18gb harddrive ^^. Plus it crashes a whole lot and takes 5 minutes (timed at 4.56) to start up.

hrdwrjnkie, i assume you're right. I wont change parts in my new computer. I'm just trying to figure things out. Like right now, my screen is pitch black, and i cannot see what im writing... That's just one of the many problems my laptop has.

Thx

Franz
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