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Event Viewer COM+ Event ?


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#1
Southend

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I was just wondering whether anyone could tell what this log was indicating, the Microsoft log support link does not give any details. Is it something to worry about, or what do I need to look at to rectify the problem?

Many thanks :whistling:

Event Type: Warning
Event Source: EventSystem
Event Category: (52)
Event ID: 4354
Date: 13/05/2006
Time: 19:44:53
User: N/A
Computer: HOME-XP
Description:
The COM+ Event System failed to fire the ConnectionLost method on subscription {A8EDB33C-55FF-4D5D-965A-27769CC279AD}-{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000}-{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000}. The subscriber returned HRESULT 80010105.

For more information, see Help and Support Center at http://go.microsoft....link/events.asp.
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#2
Retired Tech

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How to use Event Viewer to view and manage Event Logs in Windows XP

Event Viewer

In Windows XP, an event is any significant occurrence in the system or in a program that requires users to be notified, or an entry added to a log. The Event Log Service records application, security, and system events in Event Viewer. With the event logs in Event Viewer, you can obtain information about your hardware, software, and system components, and monitor security events on a local or remote computer. Event logs can help you identify and diagnose the source of current system problems, or help you predict potential system problems.

Event Log Types

A Windows XP-based computer records events in the following three logs:

• Application log

The application log contains events logged by programs. For example, a database program may record a file error in the application log. Events that are written to the application log are determined by the developers of the software program.

• Security log

The security log records events such as valid and invalid logon attempts, as well as events related to resource use, such as the creating, opening, or deleting of files. For example, when logon auditing is enabled, an event is recorded in the security log each time a user attempts to log on to the computer. You must be logged on as Administrator or as a member of the Administrators group in order to turn on, use, and specify which events are recorded in the security log.

• System log

The system log contains events logged by Windows XP system components. For example, if a driver fails to load during startup, an event is recorded in the system log. Windows XP predetermines the events that are logged by system components.

How to View Event Logs

To open Event Viewer, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, then click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management. Or, open the MMC containing the Event Viewer snap-in.

2. In the console tree, click Event Viewer.

The Application, Security, and System logs are displayed in the Event Viewer window.

How to View Event Details

To view the details of an event, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, then click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management. Or, open the MMC containing the Event Viewer snap-in.

2. In the console tree, expand Event Viewer, and then click the log that contains the event that you want to view.

3. In the details pane, double-click the event that you want to view.

The Event Properties dialog box containing header information and a description of the event is displayed.

To copy the details of the event, click the Copy button, then open a new document in the program in which you want to paste the event (for example, Microsoft Word), and then click Paste on the Edit menu.

To view the description of the previous or next event, click the UP ARROW or DOWN ARROW.

How to Interpret an Event

Each log entry is classified by type, and contains header information, and a description of the event.

Event Header

The event header contains the following information about the event:

• Date - The date the event occurred.

• Time - The time the event occurred.

• User - The user name of the user that was logged on when the event occurred.

• Computer - The name of the computer where the event occurred.

• Event ID - An event number that identifies the event type. The Event ID can be used by product support representatives to help understand what occurred in the system.

• Source - The source of the event. This can be the name of a program, a system component, or an individual component of a large program.

• Type - The type of event. This can be one of the following five types: Error, Warning, Information, Success Audit, or Failure Audit.

• Category - A classification of the event by the event source. This is primarily used in the security log.

Event Types

The description of each event that is logged depends on the type of event. Each event in a log can be classified into one of the following types:

• Information

An event that describes the successful operation of a task, such as an application, driver, or service. For example, an Information event is logged when a network driver loads successfully.

• Warning
An event that is not necessarily significant, however, may indicate the possible occurrence of a future problem. For example, a Warning message is logged when disk space starts to run low.

• Error

An event that describes a significant problem, such as the failure of a critical task. Error events may involve data loss or loss of functionality. For example, an Error event is logged if a service fails to load during startup.

• Success Audit (Security log)
An event that describes the successful completion of an audited security event. For example, a Success Audit event is logged when a user logs on to the computer.

• Failure Audit (Security log)

An event that describes an audited security event that did not complete successfully. For example, a Failure Audit may be logged when a user cannot access a network drive.

How to Find Events in a Log

The default view of event logs is to list all its entries. If you want to find a specific event, or view a subset of events, you can either search the log, or you can apply a filter to the log data.

How to Search for a Specific Log Event

To search for a specific log event, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, then click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management. Or, open the MMC containing the Event Viewer snap-in.

2. In the console tree, expand Event Viewer, and then click the log that contains the event that you want to view.

3. On the View menu, click Find.

4. Specify the options for the event that you want to view in the Find dialog box, and then click Find Next.
The event that matches your search criteria is highlighted in the details pane. Click Find Next to locate the next occurrence of an event as defined by your search criteria.

How to Filter Log Events

To filter log events, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, then click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management. Or, open the MMC containing the Event Viewer snap-in.

2. In the console tree, expand Event Viewer, and then click the log that contains the event that you want to view.

3. On the View menu, click Filter.

4. Click the Filter tab (if it is not already selected).

5. Specify the filter options that you want, and then click OK.

Only events that match your filter criteria are displayed in the details pane.

To return the view to display all log entries, click Filter on the View menu, and then click Restore Defaults.

How to Manage Log Contents

By default, the initial maximum of size of a log is set to 512 KB, and when this size is reached, new events overwrite older events as needed. Depending on your requirements, you can change these settings, or clear a log of its contents.

How to Set Log Size and Overwrite Options

To specify log size and overwrite options, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, then click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management. Or, open the MMC containing the Event Viewer snap-in.
2. In the console tree, expand Event Viewer, and then right-click the log in which you want to set size and overwrite options.

3. Under Log size, type the size that you want in the Maximum log size box.

4. Under When maximum log size is reached, click the overwrite option that you want.

5. If you want to clear the log contents, click Clear Log.

6. Click OK.

How to Archive a Log

If you want to save your log data, you can archive event logs in any of the following formats:
• Log-file format (.evt)
• Text-file format (.txt)
• Comma-delimited text-file format (.csv)

To archive a log, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, then click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management. Or, open the MMC containing the Event Viewer snap-in.

2. In the console tree, expand Event Viewer, and then right-click the log in which you want to archive, and then click Save Log File As.

3. Specify a file name and location where you want to save the file. In the Save as type box, click the format that you want, and then click Save.
The log file is saved in the format that you specified.

REFERENCES

For more information about a specific event or error, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

http://www.microsoft...entserrors.mspx

For additional information about how to use Event Viewer, see Event Viewer Help. (In the Event Viewer snap-in or Computer Management window, on the Action menu, click Help).


APPLIES TO

• Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

• Microsoft Windows XP Professional
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#3
Southend

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Thanks for your reply Keith, I've been thinking about my reply.

I unserdstand and look through most of what you posted, that's not to say I understand everything the logs are telling me. With regards to the COM+ log the MS 'Help and Support Centre' windows comes back with...

<snip>
We’re sorry, but we were unable to service your request. You may wish to choose from the links below for information about Microsoft products and services. etc.. with a load of general links to click on.
<snip>

Event Type: Warning
.....
.....
The COM+ Event System failed to fire the ConnectionLost method on subscription {A8EDB33C-55FF-4D5D-965A-27769CC279AD}-{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000}-{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000}. The subscriber returned HRESULT 80010105.

For more information, see Help and Support Center at http://go.microsoft....link/events.asp.

It also talks of a COMRes.dll, whic I've done a search for both from a , what is it and have I got it in System32 folder, yes.

I'm pretty sure it's is some hardware/driver conflict. Hence the MS Event Logs are not always ver helpful, unless the message means something to you/me.

The original timing changes I made on Friday seems to have held firm with no more blue screen crashes etc. This point may tell a bit more of the story on it's own.

Sorry if I'm appearing a bit 'blonde' here.

Thanks
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#4
Retired Tech

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Run this

http://fileforum.bet.../1/xptcprep.exe

Then run through this, which takes an while but checks most things this side of a repair install

Items in blue which are underlined are clickable to give more information about the process

Click start then run, type prefetch then press enter, click edit then select all, right click any file then click delete, confirm delete

Click start, all programmes, accessories, system tools to run disc clean up, then from system tools, run disc defragmenter.

Click start then run, type sfc /scannow then press enter, you need the XP CD and Windows File Protection will show a blue onscreen progress bar, when the bar goes, reboot

If you do not have an XP CD you can borrow a same version as was originally installed XP CD, if you downloaded SP2 then you need an SP1 XP CD

Click start then run, type chkdsk /f /r then press enter, type Y to confirm for next boot, press enter then reboot.

Windows will appear to load normally then either the monitor will show progress or the screen will go blank, do not disturb this.

This will take an hour or so before it gets to the desktop.

Download and install Tune Up 2006 Trial

Run Tune Up Disc Clean Up

Run Tune Up Registry Clean Up

Click Optimize and Improve to run Reg Defrag, which will take a few minutes and need a reboot. You should disable the antivirus programme to run this and check it is running after the reboot

After the reboot, click optimize then system optimizer to optimize the computer, select computer with an internet connection from the drop down menu, this also requires a reboot

After the reboot, click optimize then system optimizer to accelerate downloads, select the speed just above your actual connection speed, this requires a reboot

After the reboot, click optimize then system optimizer to run system advisor

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#5
Southend

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Thanks for that Keith, I'll run throught that when I have a spare couple of hours.

The TCP/IP Repair exe. I'm just a bit apprehensive here, this won't change any of my settings, as I have an adsl router, from which my son's pc is connected and also a Linksys wireless from which my daughter is connected, a home network as it were. It was after I did a BIOS update (Abit an8) Friday night, I had to quickly learn about jumpering the CMOS, I know this is different, but hence my apprehension.

Btw, I have a legit XP Pro Disc, which includes SP2.

I'll also print out your instructions so I have a crib sheet to work from, plus I need to remember a lot of that for future reference. Basically I see what your trying to get me to do, run through the basic 'repairs' to see if it irons out some of my 'glitches'

Regards :whistling:
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#6
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The TCP Repair should be fine, I've run it on mine, it would only affect the machine you run it on

It isn't essential to the plan because replacing the files with the list of things to run may well correct the errors anyway, so you can leave the TCP bit unless it proves necessary

[attachment=8417:attachment]
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#7
Southend

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The COM+ Event still continues, although in itself has detriment on the computers performance, I think it is to do with when the other computers/laptops are not running, as they are all on a shared Network, I get this COM+ message at regular intervals. If the three computers are on this event log seems to stop.

However, I'm continueing this on the same thread as I guess it maybe related. I will add at this time I have not yet run the main checks as suggested, mainly because I still feel this is a memory/timing issue, but that's not to say I will run them soon.

I had posted on the Abit forums and it was pointed out that there was an issue with the AN8 MoBo and the Crucial 'Ballistix' (2x512Mb) Memory Cards, where the default voltage of 2.6v needed to be tweaked to 2.75 ~ 2.8v. I had had it on 2.75v for a couple of days with the timings all functioning on 'Auto' without any obvious problems until today, as follows:

Ok, just had a 'blue screen crash', probably unrealated but Windows Media Player wouldn't execute for some reason, flashed up then died, tried it a couple of times. So I thought I better reboot, but will I was closing down the various applications *click* Blue Screen. Now I've set the PC to stick at the blue screen so I can read the contents, does this ring any bells to you?:eek:

Just the main parts of the error message:

<snip>
***STOP: 0X0000008E (0xC0000005, 0XBK802ADE, 0XB8E5715c, 0x00000000)
***win32k.sys - address BF802ADE base at BF800000, DateStamp 43446a58

Beginning dump of physical memory
Physical memory dump complete
Contact your system administrator.. etc...

<snip>

Ok I have increased the SDRAM voltage to 2.8v (was 2.75v), see how it goes. Memory timings untouched and on Auto.

One other comment, I had a faulting module earlier with Firefox, the programme then had to close, only once this one, but before I knew anything about timing(s) I used to get many of these types of errors on Firefox, Excel, Notepad etc. Don't know if it has any significance.

Again I'm open to any suggestions, especially advise if I need to set timings manually because my understanding is a bit 'hit or miss' when changing these things.

Many thanks

Keith (Southend)

Computer System.
Abit AN8 nForce4 Socket 939 PCI-Express Motherboard
Crutial PC3200 Ballistix (2x512MB) 1GB Dual Channel Kit
AMD Athlon 64 3200+ Winchester 90nm (Socket 939)
Zalman CNPS7700-Cu 120mm Cooler
Aerocool Aeropower II+ Acrylic-Titanium Plated 450W Power Supply
Asus Extreme EN6200 Turbo Cache PCI-Express 256MB DDR 64BIT TV-OUT DVI
Western Digital Caviar 7200RPM 80GB FDB 8Mb SATA OEM (WD800JD) *Operating System on the SATA Drive*
Maxtor DiamondMAX Plus 9 120Gb OEM ATA/133 8MB Buffer (6Y120P0)
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#8
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I would ask in the networking forum about having to have the 3 PC's on, there is a setting which has the PC check the network and it may be getting this if it is checking when the other PC's are off
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#9
Southend

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Early days yet I know, but since tweaking the voltage to the SDRAM to 2.8c (2.77v displays on the Dashboard), the only error message is the COM+ one on the 'Application', 'System' only a couple that are standard 'ok' messages, Windows Defender etc.

Fingers crossed. :whistling:

Keith (Southend)
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