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QoS Packet Scheduler


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#1
adqjohn

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Hmmm.... I have noticed that on both my XP computers, under Network Connection Properties, that QoS is installed (enabled). Why is that? Is this a default setting for XP? On my little home network there should be no need for packet scheduling and flow control.... OR IS THERE? Set me straight.
Thanx, John

Peace thru Superior Firepower!
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#2
gerryf

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no need on the local network, it is the default in sp2, I am pretty sure.

It does no harm being there. There are MANY sites on the Internet that erroneously report that QoS reserves 10 percent of your bandwith for flow control, but this is inaccurate

It ONLY does that if QoS is functioning. Since you are not using it, it does not do that.

You can leave it there without concern. You can also remove it, I suppose, but I just leave it
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#3
adqjohn

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Thanx Gerry, but doesn't the checkmark in the box mean it is being used? What determines if it is functioning?
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#4
gerryf

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It means it is available to be used, not that it is in use.

Let me try to put this more clearly.

You have quality of service enabled. You are surfing the web. While surfing the web, and simultaneously downloading a large file. Neither websurfing or typical downloads require quality of service so it sits there doing nothing.

Now, let's say you are a programmer and you have a network and you are doing videoconferencing. You have created a special program to videoconference and it takes advantage of quality of service. Now, it does kick in, and reserves a degree of bandwith to ensure that all the video packets move back and forth, because the program demands it.

It is the program or function that determines its use.

There are very few things that require QofS at the moment because there is very little data that has to absolutely positively arrive 100 percent, packet by packet

When you download a program, your PC is CONSTANTLY dropping packets...your computer simply recognizes this and asks for the packet again if it does not arrive. It's no big deal because the process of data communication expects data packets to be lost.

So, to answer that more succinctly, QofS is only on when a program requires it be one

If a program does not require it, it is not using your bandwith, if a program does require it, you will regret it not being on
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#5
adqjohn

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Thanx gf. That's exactly the kind of answer I like to get. Thorough and completely understandable.

God Bless the Geeks
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