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Xbox 360 - HDTV?


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#16
warriorscot

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i dont know i can tell the difference between 1080 and 720 on a 32" myself you dont notice on smaller screens but ild say anything over 27" you start to notice at least i do but there are other reasons to that not just sharpness the panels that run at the higher resolution tend to be better as well so thats antoher factor.

Its kinda confusing most of those TVs support inputs of 1080 or 720 just fine, but it helps to think of what 1080 and 720 are they are just another way of talking of resolution 1080 is 1920 × 1080 and 720 is usually on 1366x768 then you get the difference between p and i. p is better than i but a 1080p is a rare beast to see as its not used by any of the hdtv providers i know of andHDTV movies are rarer than hens teeth, although when you see one its a jaw dropping site but youre only going to see it connected to a computer really, 1080i and 720p are actually pretty close the advantages and disadvantages tend to balance themselves out sometimes usually its not a problem as 1080i TVs are more expensive and 720p ones are much cheaper.

If you are confused i would read the wikipedia hdtv explanations its quite complicated i just think about the specs like i would a computer monitor rather than a TV.

Edited by warriorscot, 28 September 2006 - 05:11 PM.

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#17
Steve Soleimani

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I'm just skeptical of buying a TV that won't improve my graphics of Halo 2 on Xbox 360 (and anyother game i have that can be displayed in HD, which right now any game i have like Halo 2 is the same graphics as Xbox.) which there is no point why i have 360 with out a HDTV. so does ANY LCD HDTV improve or show the maximum graphic capibilities of Xbox 360. Like does size really matter if its a HDTV. Like mine now is a Philips 27" Glass Screen (Bubble) - I did not take this picture but its my TV (http://abaco.ya.com/Julencafusa/TV.jpg). [bleep].

On this TV there i a HUGE glare through my window. extremely bothering when playing a game. Does a LCD HDTV not glare from light or sun??????????????
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#18
warriorscot

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Anything with a shony surface will produce glare although its usually less on LCD beause they usually dont use a glass panel on he front if you have glare you need to move the TV somewhere else or orient it differently to prevent glare. Flat screens though get less glare as well, that TV is a standard one so resolution is going to be low HDTV is basically just outputing at a higher resolution so image quality will be better as the higher the res genreally the better the image looks.
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#19
Steve Soleimani

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wow ok. I now just heard of a new type of so called tv. HDTV DLP or DLP HDTV. What is this? Something with Mirrors.

"Digital Light Processing (DLP) is a technology used in projectors and video projectors. It was originally developed at Texas Instruments, in 1987 by Dr. Larry Hornbeck.

In DLP projectors, the image is created by microscopically small mirrors laid out in a matrix on a semiconductor chip, known as a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD). Each mirror represents one pixel in the projected image. The number of mirrors corresponds to the resolution of the projected image. 800x600, 1024x768, 1280x720, and 1920x1080 (HDTV) matrices are some common DMD sizes. These mirrors can be repositioned rapidly to reflect light either through the lens or on to a heatsink (called a light dump in Barco terminology).

The rapid repositioning of the mirrors (essentially switching between 'on' and 'off') allows the DMD to vary the intensity of the light being reflected out through the lens, creating shades of grey in addition to white (mirror in 'on' position) and black (mirror in 'off' position)."

So am i able to by a LCD DLP HDTV. or is it just a DLP HDTV. or Plasma DLP HDTV. arg
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#20
warriorscot

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You cant get LCD DLPs DLP is its own technology, its basically an updated type of rear projection TV.
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#21
Steve Soleimani

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So what would you say is better a LCD HDTV or a LCD DLP???

Price wise?

Size wise?

Picture wise?
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#22
james_8970

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Never read this entire topic....
However regarding your question, LCD HDTV wins all categories as "LCD DLP" is a none existant technology.
There are only 3 big screen technology avaible. They are as listed below (each line is a DIFFERENT technology)

LCD
Plasma
DLP
Rear projection (but its a dead technology, havn't seen them in the stores lately but could be wrong)

This was already mentioned by warriorscot please read a post before you post.
Also when you make your budget up, keep in mind the cables that you are required to buy, don't think them to be the cheap cooper ones (they range in price from 60-120$), as well as the external HD-DVD coming out novermeber 17 and i believe its 180$
James

Edited by james_8970, 01 October 2006 - 05:36 PM.

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#23
warriorscot

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Yeah you can totally ruin a new television by cheaping out on cables its amazing how people can spend thousands on a TV and use the cheapest cables they can find.
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#24
james_8970

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*cough* My parents *cough*
we bought a 4000$ TV, then bought a 1000$ home theatre.....then bought 10$ cables and a 40 dollar DVD.
LOL if only it worked that way......lets just say DVD player anc cables lastest a hole 2 weeks because the 4000$ TV=the 200$ TV. Cables are one of the biggest things that influence your experience, cut back on them and you might as well stick with the old crap.
James
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#25
Steve Soleimani

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Cables...hmm well. im not using it for a thousand things. only for TV and Xbox 360. the 360 comes with the proper cables. and its also a dvd player, and TV doesnt require a cable, except the cable going from the tv to the wall which i have, and so does everyone else who is watching tv.

cables = not a problem for me
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#26
james_8970

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Yes i understand that the X box 360 has cables, but if you want to have the full experience with the HDTV that you are planning to buy or already have, you need different cables. The ones that come with the Xbox360 are only SDTV (standard definition). This is purly your choice, but there is no reason to buy a new TV for HDTV for your xbox 360 if you don't plan on buying the cables.
Never mind i just found out that HDMI isn't supported on Xbox 360, your stuck at 720p it seems.
James

P.S. The DVD and cable thing had nothing to do with one of your questions, it was just me and warriorscot getting a little off topic.

Edited by james_8970, 01 October 2006 - 07:58 PM.

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#27
Steve Soleimani

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The 360 come with a "Xbox 360™ Component HD AV Cable":

"Showcase stunning Xbox 360 high-definition graphics with the component connection on your HDTV. Play high-quality audio with the included stereo connection or use the optical audio port for digital sound. The eight-foot shielded cable also includes the more traditional composite connections for use with standard-definition televisions."

"Features:

*
High-definition gaming output of 720p or 1080i


*
Progressive-scan DVD playback in 480p


*
Dolby® Digital 5.1 Surround Sound output


*
Component (Y, Pr, Pb) high-definition video output


*
Composite cable for standard TV output


*
Eight-foot-long shielded cable"

http://www.xbox.com/...mponenthdcable/

Edited by Steve Soleimani, 01 October 2006 - 08:32 PM.

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#28
james_8970

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ya just realised that my sources where a little dated....:whistling:
James
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#29
warriorscot

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I think what james is saying the best cables cost more than your xbox, also dont underestimate the difference a good coax cable can make you can drastically cut down interference and improve signal quality with better stuff.

But for the 360 its lack of a proper HDMI interface makes it kinda useless to replace the cable thats its biggest disadvantage for use with HDTV.
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#30
Steve Soleimani

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So what proper cables would i need for this HDMI or whatever for the 360?
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