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Upgrading trouble


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#1
Dark_Orion

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This computer was first built by me; upgrade is also being done by me. Added info about my background, so far Iíve built 4 computers, upgraded a few others, and given lots of tech support to friends, family, and neighbors.

Started with:

CPU - Intel Pentium 4 531
Motherboard - ASUS P5P800SE
Video - GeForce FX 5700LE 128Mb
Ram - 2 sticks of PNY 512 mb = 1 gig, 1 stick of Compaq build brand at 256 mb

Upgrade to:

CPU - stays the same
Motherboard - Asus P5SD2-X SiS 656
Video - GeForce 6200 LE PCI Express 128MB
Ram - 1 stick Corsair VS1GB533D2 1GB DDR2-533 PC2-4200 Value Select Memory

The problem is... I made the upgrade and started the computer, it did start and i was able to start the installation of Windows XP home, but just into the process the computer just shut off. Many times I would get further in to the installation and some times not as far and again the computer would just shut its self off. I planed to just put it back together the way it started, but once that was done and I started it up the computer went as far as the Motherboard screen and just shut off. Any help would be wonderful and if some one out there thinks they could help but needs more info first just let me know and Iíd be happy to tell you.
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#2
SRX660

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The first thought here is the cpu temp is reaching the bios shutoff point. Make sure your temp is not doing this. You can watch the temp in your bios if you go into the bios at startup. If the temp does not get up to the shutoff point while sittin in the bios then you motherboard is probably bad. I do not have much luck with Asus boards. So far i have had a 33% failure rate in only 10 boards. 1 out of every 3 boards makes me choose other makers of motherboards. I can't afford the return shipment costs.

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#3
Dark_Orion

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Well that would be interesting, this computer has 4 case fans, CPU slandered heatsink and fan, and turbine a/c cooler for a 5.25 bay. Short of upgrading to water cooling there really isnt much that I can do to lower the temp. Iím using 2 motherboards (yes both Asus) one of which was used for almost 2 years before this. Any other possibilities would be welcomed, but at this point I still canít get it working.
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#4
SRX660

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Sorry if i tried to help you with what information you gave me. It shall not happen again.

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#5
warriorscot

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Actually all that cooling means nothing if you didn't fit your HSF properly did you remember to clean,dry and reapply thermal material and ensure contact between HSF and proc, it does sound like its temperature related, what i would do instead of saying how many fans you have is actually check your temperatures.

Motherboard, could be the problem try upgrading to the latest Bios that can sometimes help with Asus boards can recover a few but like SRX said they are iffy.

Also did you take ESD precautions, and have you tried it out of the case on cardboard with minimum hardware.
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#6
Dark_Orion

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No sorry to you srx if I sounded mean or some thing, I was only in a hurry. I myself thought that I was a bit harsh with my reply but didnít have the time to double check it. Iím sure itís not the HSF Iíve gone over that. I read somewhere on here that some one else needed to try the cardboard thing so I guess I really should try that myself. Iím just not understanding how the starting motherboard could only after about 2 hours or so end up doing the same thing as the new board (or close to the same thing). Everything was working fine before I started the upgrade. My gf had to log out of WoW and turn off the computer before I could even start to work.
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#7
warriorscot

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So everytime you are removing the HSF you are cleaning it with alcohol and reapplying fresh thermal material. Doing it on cardboard has a number of advantages it makes it easier to work with for a start. We have a guide to cover it i think its called the new build guide or something along those lines.

Inspect the components for any damage caused from heat, handling or ESD.

Have you checked your PSU, new components can draw more power and if the power output was borderline whether to as it was enough an upgrade might push it over the edge and cause it to short out when more power is drawn.

But i would really go into bios to check the temperatures if you havent allready you can be sure but its good to check.

Is the HDD ok, was it acting up before hand, if youve got one try booting to a live CD and that way you can make sure the HDD is not failing but it doesnt sound like it worth a try though.
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#8
Dark_Orion

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Well no not cleaning it with alcohol no, but I do wipe off the old thermal and reapply every time. I definitely know why building on cardboard would/could be easier, kind of like that computer work station that lets you build the system right on the desk. Just how would I go about inspecting for heat or ESD damage? I guess looking for handling damage would be looking, but are you suggesting that I could see heat damage? :whistling: Iíve seen plenty of people on lots of sights talk about the PSU, but I really have no idea how to go about checking up it out and seeing if there may be a problem with it. It seems kind of odd that the PSU may not be enough power cuz itís a 550 W. were in the BIOS would i go to see what the temp is? Oh I have gone there once so far and once again the computer shut off on me so I just havenít gone back. The starting HDD is Western Digital 80 gig IDE 7200; Iím also upgrading that to a Hitachi 80 gig SATA 7200 and setting the WD to secondary. Iíve also got a Samsung 20 gig that my gf had as a secondary before the upgrade. Iíve tried dropping the new OS onto all 3 HDD but not one will take before the computer shuts off. It may take a day or 2 before I can try the cardboard thing, but any other ideas Iím up for the help, thanks.
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#9
Dan1887

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I ran into a problem like that before, it would boot up to the windows installation start and the power off, first cause was a bad video card try taking the video card out first doing the install, it also sounds like it might be a bad connection with a component, if you can get to the windows xp instalation then u are going past bios and so u shouldn;t be having a problem there other then those two things the only other suggestion i would give is that same as the others u have been given and thats that ur mobo is overheating
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#10
Kurenai

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If you're getting crashing in BIOS, then you're looking at:

1. CPU overheat
2. Bad RAM
3. Possible short.


To check 1. get into the BIOS, find the Hardware Monitor or PC Health Status, and check your CPU temp. to check 2., try different RAM, although you run the risk of corrupting whatever you put in, if it's a bad slot. To check 3., strip it down to:
Motherboard
CPU
1 stick of RAM
video card

That's it, nothing else should be connected or plugged in. Only power to the motherboard, and CPU fan lead to the motherboard. Make sure you're using a copper riser in every slot that you're using to screw the mobo into the case, and see if you can boot to BIOS and have it be stable.
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