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firefox vs. ie


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#1
crazyivan2

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why should i use firefox over ie? i just got firefox today and i like it but why have the extra broser ?
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#2
SRX660

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Why do i like firefox? Is it because i do not have to worry about BHO's anymore since firefox does not support Browser Helper Objects. Or maybe it is because i don't have to think about DSO's taking my computer to places on the internet where i don't want to go to. You might look up DSO exploits sometime and find out why most of them affect Windows Internet Explorer. There are other reasons i use firefox, like the tabbed browsing and the ability to change the themes on firefox to suit me easily, among other things. Firefox is also faster than IE, and skips a lot of the advertising that IE seems to find on the same webpage. SO i use IE only when necessary which lately is very seldom nowadays. Too bad you can't take IE off the windows Operating System, otherwise it would have been long gone on my computer.

SRX660
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#3
crazyivan2

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cool man, im messin with it right now, it is too bad ie is stuck ther, i hate haveing thing on my pc that are unused
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#4
silverbeard

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hi SRX660,

If you would truly like to rid yourself of IE you should check out nlite. It allows you to customize your XP install so that it has what you want and you can make it install unattended.
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#5
Johanna

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Ummmm...IE is directly hooked to a bunch of other stuff in Windows, like Outlook Express and Windows Explorer, and you need it to get MS updates. If you don't want to use it, just ignore it, but I wouldn't go trying to uninstall or delete it without having all backups done, because you could possibly trash XP by accident.
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#6
silverbeard

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Hi Johanna,

It's a deployment tool and free. I've used it to trim the things I don't like in XP like WMP, support for foreign languages, visual styles(XP theme), OE, and yes IE. Windows Explore will function without IE. You can leave the IE core if want to run a browser like Maxthon or Avant.

You would be suprised what you can strip out of XP and still have a very functional OS. Look at Bart's PE. It will load a XP environment from CD/DVD, USB thumb drive or can be installed to HD as a rescue partition.

Oh, you can always update your windows the way network administrator does and download them your self or use Autopatcher like I do to update the XP machines I have.

Edited by silverbeard, 10 November 2006 - 12:54 PM.

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#7
Johanna

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Silverbeard,
I have no doubt that someone with your level of experience can use nlite productively, but it's a powerful tool, and a user without your skills could really bork a computer. Thanks for the link- I think I'll play with it on my laptop, just for fun.
Best regards,
Johanna
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#8
Macro Svelte

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There is a way to remove Internet Explorer from Windows, but it's not worth the hassle. Whether or not you realize it, you actually do need IE; it's used throughout Windows. For example, Outlook, Word, Windows Explorer--basically any apps that need to render HTML--all rely on IE to some degree. If you remove IE, which requires editing your system registry files (something I don't recommend unless you have experience and a good backup first), you'll then have to associate these apps with another Web rendering product in order to view, for example, HTML-enabled e-mail. Not impossible, but I'm sure you have better use for your time. Instead, simply drag and drop your IE icon to the trash and just forget about it.


This is a good simple elaboration - via Robert Vamossi (C|Net .com)- of something Johanna touched on.
Some day I might learn how to extract the parts of IE I have no use for, but it's never safe for a beginner to try, with a tool like nlite.

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