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Full access to a second hard drive needed


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#1
fremel

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Hi geeks community:

I hope I can find some help here. My problem is this: I had a serious problem with my computer and I had to replace motherboard, processor and memories. Also, because the technician could not get the system back, he called me to format my hard disk. I didn't like that option so I asked him to put another (new) disk drive and try to keep my data in the other one.

Back home I installed the second HD (as drive F:) and I could get access to all the previous data, e.g., my wife's, my son's files. The only exception is that I cannot see my own (previous) folders. For instance, when I put the cursor on my own user, under Document and Settings on drive F: the hint shows it as empty. If I try to see its contents the system says: "F:\Documents and Settings\xxxx not available" "Access is Denied", being xxxx my user name.

I do not think that my folder is empty; the difference between my user name and the others is that I used a password and I might have set the option keep my folders private ON.

BTW my computer system is XP

Any hint will be appreciatted

Thanks

Fremel
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#2
wannabe1

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Hi fremel...

See if Taking Ownership of the folder or files will help.

wannabe1
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#3
b1caez01

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"had to replace motherboard, processor and memories"

Wouldn't this necessitate the exact settings from the old hardware being "inserted" into the schema of the new stuff...as the old hard drive has been "setup" as a mate to the old hardware...and the new hard ware, won't know what its looking for, as it can neither "see" it or even acknowledge its presence :blink: I don't believe this can be done...if so, I'd sure like to know how... :)

Unfortunately, not all techies are created equal, nor are all competent to make the decision to reformat, but at least he gave you the option, and you wisely saved your h-d. Now as to whether that was a useful decision or not, time will tell.

With respect [I am open to correction], the URL suggested, may only help if the file being accessed is on the same drive that was first set up with the same motherboard. So, if you change hard drives only, the new hard drive will be "set" to the old mother board, it does not work t'other way 'round...as far as I know...and to which I alluded to before :help:

I am a firm believer in cryogenics for computers...save it all, someday, someone will figure out how to do it :whistling:

...or am I totally off the back of a turnip truck :rofl:

Edited by b1caez01, 19 November 2006 - 10:10 PM.

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#4
wannabe1

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If the files can be seen, but access is denied, usually taking ownership of the files will allow them to be recovered.

Settings related to the hardware are only required on the root drive, or the drive the operating system is installed on. In this case, the old HDD will be seen simply as a storage drive...that happens to have a windows folder on it.
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#5
b1caez01

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Yes, but we do not have a hard drive that is now trying to be recognized as a slave. We have a new mother board. Is that not en entirely different kettle of fish? New mother boards have a whole new way of looking at things. And since it did not "birth" the hard drive we are trying to access, then it does not see it. No?

Mothers know their own children, and if one does not look like it belongs, out it goes :whistling:
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#6
Kurenai

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No, wannabe is completely correct, it's a file permissions ("ownership") issue. Hard drives do not bind to motherboards in any sense of the word. The only time you get conflicts is when you try to swap out just a motherboard, and not change anything on the hard drive. The reason for this: when you install windows on a particular system, it loads drivers specific to the motherboard in that system. If you just swap the mobo, those drivers do not exist for that motherboard, and no Windows for you.

In this case, we DO have a hard drive that is trying to be recognized as a slave. The old HDD is being slaved, and Windows is still booting from the brand new drive that the tech installed.

Wannabe1: if taking ownership doesn't work, linux livecd and recover the files that way?
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#7
b1caez01

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Okey dokey, but I am sure that I read on geeksters, in one of the fora, of this very issue, and as I recall, my response was what was noted there... but then as an old timer, I often put my pants on backwards and wonder where I've been :whistling:
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#8
peterm

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xp pro or home
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#9
b1caez01

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xp pro or home...?

don't recall :whistling:
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#10
fremel

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Alright, the advice of taking ownership worked perfectly (after being able to finally start in Safe Mode).

Thanks a lot

Fremel
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#11
wannabe1

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Glad to help! :whistling:
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#12
b1caez01

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For the benefit of those who do not have easy access to the How To... here it is from the XP Help and Resources section...

How to take ownership of a file or folder in Windows XP
View products that this article applies to.
Article ID : 308421
Last Review : June 23, 2005
Revision : 2.4
This article was previously published under Q308421
On This Page

INTRODUCTION

MORE INFORMATION

How to take ownership of a folder

How to take ownership of a file

REFERENCES
INTRODUCTION
This article describes how to take ownership of a file or a folder where you have been denied access.

If you must access a file or a folder that you do not have access to, you must take ownership of that file or folder. When you do this, you replace the security permissions to have access.

MORE INFORMATION
How to take ownership of a folder
Note You must be logged on to the computer with an account that has administrative credentials. If you are running Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition, you must start the computer in safe mode, and then log on with an account that has Administrative rights to have access to the Security tab.

If you are using Windows XP Professional, you must disable Simple File Sharing. By default, Windows XP Professional uses Simple File sharing when it is not joined to a domain.

For additional information about how to do this, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
307874 (http://support.micro....com/kb/307874/) How to disable simplified sharing and set permissions on a shared folder in Windows XP
To take ownership of a folder, follow these steps: 1. Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
2. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
3. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
4. In the Name list, click your user name, or click Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group. If you want to take ownership of the contents of that folder, select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box.
5. Click OK, and then click Yes when you receive the following message:
You do not have permission to read the contents of directory folder name. Do you want to replace the directory permissions with permissions granting you Full Control?

All permissions will be replaced if you press Yes.
Note folder name is the name of the folder that you want to take ownership of.
6. Click OK, and then reapply the permissions and security settings that you want for the folder and its contents.

How to take ownership of a file
Note You must be logged on to the computer with an account that has administrative credentials.

To take ownership of a file, follow these steps: 1. Right-click the file that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
2. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
3. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
4. In the Name list, click Administrator, or click the Administrators group, and then click OK.

The administrator or the Administrators group now owns the file. To change the permissions on the files and folders under this folder, go to step 5.
5. Click Add.
6. In the Enter the object names to select (examples) list, type the user or group account that you want to give access to the file. For example, type Administrator.
7. Click OK.
8. In the Group or user names list, click the account that you want, and then select the check boxes of the permissions that you want to assign that user.
9. When you are finished assigning permissions, click OK.

REFERENCES
For additional information about file and folder permissions, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
161275 (http://support.micro....com/kb/161275/) Interaction of file and folder security on NTFS volumes
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