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Setting up an Intranet using an XP Pro server


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#1
ada123

ada123

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Hello,

I want to set up an intranet using a Windows XP Pro machine as a server. I've installed IIS 5.1 from the installation disk and updated Windows. But I'm unsure what I have to do to set up the intranet.

If I place my html files in the wwwroot folder created on my C drive, would they then be avaliable to access by any computer on the LAN, or would they be avaliable to anyone on the internet?

I dont want the computer to become a web server.

Also, what is the difference between an FTP server and an HTTP server?

Thanks

btw: i want to do this simply to learn more about networking... :whistling:
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#2
Neil Jones

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An Intranet is a series of webpages inside a network.

Say you have a college of 50 staff PC's and 450 student PC's. All these computers are part of the same network, therefore any computer can access any other computer on the network. All an Intranet is is one computer acting as a server. They're just basically a mini local Internet, only with one difference that the pages on an Intranet are closed - if you're not on one of these 500 PC's, you can't get at the pages on the Intranet.

You should be able to set up IIS so it only responds to local requests from the Intranet as opposed to the Internet.

An FTP server is for file sharing and storage (it stands for File Transfer Protocol) - You can FTP to many places on the internet and download stuff that way. It's designed to handle lots of users in one go.

A HTTP server is for normal web traffic. Again you can download big files in this fashion but if lots of people start downloading the same file, there's only so much room available to fit everybody in. In addition to this, HTTP servers also handle requests for normal webpages as well so on very busy occasions it may well be nobody can get to it at all.
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#3
ada123

ada123

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Hey Neil thanks for the reply

You should be able to set up IIS so it only responds to local requests from the Intranet as opposed to the Internet.


any suggestions as to how i'd go about doing that?

cheers

Edited by ada123, 29 December 2006 - 03:19 PM.

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#4
Neil Jones

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Never used IIS so unfortunately I can't advise. Poke about in its options, should be something in there.

Alternatively, one Google later, try this:
http://www.windowsit...2274/22274.html
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#5
ada123

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Hey thats really useful thanks sorry for the late reply.
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