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Using two NICs


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#31
vally

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I don't think that they were thinking that it was for a home net work. :whistling:
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#32
dsenette

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the biggest problem with a 4gig connection (if they were all bridged as a bove) is that switches/hubs/routers can only handle gigabit transmissions at the moment...even IF that switch connected to fiber...the switch would still be slowing it down...maybe it would be GREAT for pc to pc connections if both had the same nic
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#33
starjax

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true, but keep in mind that they are doing 4x1000. Even with my multiple systems running with gig ether, I haven't even come close to maxing out my gig switch. It takes an awful lot of data to max out a gig connection. This is really intended for home servers, as people continue to share out movies, videos, and other digital media.

Draft-n routers are being sold now. At the moment they are the only ones that have 4x1000 ports. dlink is the only one that offers a 4x1000 (wireless g). I had to add a switch to my setup to get the additional bandwidth.
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#34
dsenette

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true, but keep in mind that they are doing 4x1000. Even with my multiple systems running with gig ether, I haven't even come close to maxing out my gig switch. It takes an awful lot of data to max out a gig connection. This is really intended for home servers, as people continue to share out movies, videos, and other digital media

true enough! but that's a gigabit a port...i'm assuming that by "multiplexing" the nic on this magical device...that it was intended to have a single wire? instead of occupying 4 ports on a switch? sort of like SLI on video cards...two cards working together...one output? but if you're actually plugging 4 wires to the pc...but it's sending the packets on each wire (i.e. an 8 packet transmission would take half as long if it were pushed out through 4 wires at the same time)...then that would deffinitely speed some stuff up (and honestly i didn't concider that possibility)...
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#35
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here is a pictured and the article with a bit more info:
http://www.vr-zone.com/?i=4487

Anandtech just had their sample shipped on 1/17/07. So they should have an article up in about two weeks or so.

Edited by starjax, 30 January 2007 - 08:03 AM.

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#36
dsenette

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aha! conflicting reports

GIGABYTE Quad LAN with Teaming functionality enabled allows 2 sets of 2GB connections to each act as a single connection for twice the bandwidth, improving overall throughput with lower CPU utilization.

...2 2gb instead of 1 4gb?....either way...a 2gb connection on a single wire (which is what this is suggesting) will still bottleneck at the switch...untill they up the speed on those ports...which....maybe means there are some multigigabit ethernet switches on the way?....hehe screw it...just wire your house with fibre and get fibre channel nics right?
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#37
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along with FIOS :whistling:
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#38
dsenette

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hehe indeed!...mmmm fibre from the ISP to the door...yummy!
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#39
RjBass

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I love where this topic went.

Good posting guys.
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#40
vally

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Even with my multiple systems running with gig ether, I haven't even come close to maxing out my gig switch.

You need to have allot of data and ALLOT of computers 2 really push limits on the gig switch. I read that the switches are made for heavy trafic with many gig connections. I haven't seen a good gig switch get to 20%
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#41
dsenette

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well...my point of "overloading" or capacity in general..wasn't complete switch capacity....i've you've got a 4 port gigabit switch...then the switch itself in total can handle roughly 4gigabits (usually more) of info easy...but...if you exceed 1 gigabit on a single port..you're not getting the full effect...because the single port can only handle a gigabit a second..if you're pushing 3 or 4 gigabits into one port...it's still only going to move at 1 gigabit....it's not like the switch is going to say "well..i've got 4 gigabit ports...but only one of them is being used...and it's requesting 3 gigabit transmissions...let me just pool my resources"...each port is in escence...a seperate device...as far as throughput is concerned
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