Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Screensavers for LCD....


  • Please log in to reply

#1
UV_Power

UV_Power

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 391 posts
I know that for CRTs the screensavers prevent burnt-in images, but what about LCDs that aren't concerned with that? I have tried to research the possible disadvantages of running a screensaver on an LCD, but with little help.

To me it seems like a screensaver would cause the backlight to wear down faster and possibly increase the chances of stuck (or dead) pixels. I am completely guessing at this point, though.

Basically, my question is are there disadvantages to running a screensaver on an LCD?

In contrast, is it better to run a screensaver on an LCD or will it be just fine if I never had one running?

Just wondering.... :whistling:
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Neil Jones

Neil Jones

    Member 5k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,476 posts
Screensavers are not as important as they used to be. With advances in modern technology and the advent of TFT flatscreen monitors, they're virtually irrelevant.

In the olden days, all a screensaver's purpose was was to stop the image burning into the screen, which would happen if it was left there for too long. As time went on, newer CRT monitors don't have this issue any longer as they are designed with this flaw in mind so they have effectively designed around it.

LCD monitors work in an entirely different way, they don't use projection techniques therefore there is no way for burn in to occur. Instead of drawing the picture 60/75/85 times a second, the individual pixels just change colour as and when.

In theory it may be possible to observe burn-in even on this technology but as the individual pixels are so less powerful than the cathode-rays of CRTs, the monitor will most likely have been replaced (either by the end of its natural working life when its cheaper to buy a new one than repair, or through dead pixel warranty replacement) than exhibit burn-in.
  • 0

#3
UV_Power

UV_Power

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 391 posts
I see...

So, would you also agree that screensavers are unnecessary for LCDs?
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP