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First time builder


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#1
Flint

Flint

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Hi there,

I'm planning on trying to build my own computer for the first time. I've been doing some research, finding out which parts I need to get, learning how to install the processor, how to connect things, etc. I've been spending a lot of time on newegg checking out parts and putting together a list of what I want. But there is still something that i'm not sure about.

I feel like as i'm going through each part.. the video card, the mobo, the PSU, etc... that each thing has special, individual requirements. Certain kinds of power pins. Certain kinds of slots. Certain amounts of slots. Certain amounts of space. Certain types of connectors. If I find a motherboard that supports the processor I want and has the correct slot for the video card I want, I have to also find a PSU that has the correct type of power connector for the mobo's power plug. Then I have to make sure that PSU has enough power for the video card and proper connections for the video card and other peripherals. I have to make sure the mobo has support for the drives I want, etc.. I can't keep track of every thing and my biggest fear is spending all this money on my new machine to find out that certain parts aren't compatible with each other.

So I was wondering if some of you experts here could give me some advice.

What are the MAIN things I need to keep in mind? Is there some sort of overall checklist of specifications and requirements that allow me to make sure all of my parts will support each other?

My plan to primarily use my computer for gaming, but would also like lots of storage and media options. Big HD, CD and DVD burners, and at least 2GB of RAM.

Here are some of the parts I am looking at putting in my machine:
GeForce 8800 GTS Video Card
12V v2.2 530W Power Supply
Core 2 Duo Processor
LGA 775 Motherboard
320GB Hard Drive (check the price, oh yeah!)

How are things looking so far? Keep in mind i'm not asking for your opinions on the specs (yet!) I just want to know that everything is compatible. I can verify pins and slots and wattage until i'm blue in the face.. but there are a lot of ther specs and requirements on those parts and I don't know what's important and what's not.

Thanks!
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#2
SOORENA

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Hi Flint,

What is your price range for this build?

That PSU probably wont have enough juice for that video card. Are you planning on overclcoking this build?
For now the Video Card and CPU are good, if you want your hard drive to be better I would go with a 16Mb cache hard drive and probably a SATA 2 also, as it will be faster.

Thanks

Soorena
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#3
Flint

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Hi Flint,

What is your price range for this build?

That PSU probably wont have enough juice for that video card. Are you planning on overclcoking this build?
For now the Video Card and CPU are good, if you want your hard drive to be better I would go with a 16Mb cache hard drive and probably a SATA 2 also, as it will be faster.

Thanks

Soorena


I'm trying to budget myself at $1,000 (excluding monitor)
I might overclock, I haven't really decided on that one yet. If I do, it won't be immediately. I'd have to give it time and decide if I really want or need to.

Also, as for the PSU, newegg says the minimum power for the 8800GTS is 400W, so naturally I go above that to 530W.. you think it still isn't enough? That's actually one of the questions I have... once you have enough power for the video card, how much more should I tack on for the rest of the machine? Would a 600W PSU be better?

Edited by Flint, 02 August 2007 - 12:32 PM.

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#4
Titan8990

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Wattage is not the problem with the PSU. Read the requirements for the card a bit more carefully. "Minimum of a 400 Watt power supply.
(Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 26 Amps.)". In single rail 12v all of the 12v amps can be added together but in the one that you have selected, which is dual 12v, it can not. I recommend this: http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817371002. It is also a higher quality brand then the one you have selected.

I also recommend getting a P35 chipset board. That way if you want to upgrade to quad core down the road. I'm actually not sure if that board can run the new 1333mhz FSB chips. Hopefully someone will drop in because that is something I would like know myself.
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#5
Flint

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Before you replied, Titan, I had already gone in and made some changes to my items. I changed boards actually to an nvidia 680i sli... I think it should be better than that ASUS one I originally linked to.

Here's the setup so far:
Antec 900 Case
nVidia 680i SLI Motherboard
GeForce 8800 GTS Video Card
Antec 550W PSU - as suggested
Core 2 Duo CPU
320GB 16Mb-cache Hard Drive - upgrade to the 16mb cache as suggested
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