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Computer won't turn on


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#1
wreekhavoc

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Hello G2G,
I recently opened up my CPU in order to clean out the dust, I do this at once every three months. This time unfortunately, after cleaning I plugged in the AC cord and the LED light starts flashing and the computer will not come on. There is no power, I can't even boot up. I had someone look at it and they tell me that it could have been a power surge after I plugged the CPU back in or I may have accidentally unplugged something internally during cleaning the dust out. I assure you, I didn't touch anything that would account for anything coming unplugged internally ( I sure hope not). They also told me that the motherboard and hard drives could've been damaged. Is there anyway I can fix this? Is it a possibility that my hard drive, files and other programs are saveable? :wave: :) :)
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#2
Titan8990

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Yes, it is very possible. When PSUs send a spike it often takes out the main board but hard disks aern't as common. Put the drive into a friends computer and recover all your data. Then you can drop it back in your machine so you can attempt to get it fixed.

Nine times out of ten when your press the power button and it does nothing you will have to get a new power supply.

Edited by Titan8990, 18 September 2007 - 02:11 PM.

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#3
wreekhavoc

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Thanks Titan8990,
Is there anything else replace the motherboard? Any suggestions on how to and where I can get another power supply?
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#4
Titan8990

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I would first of all double check that nothing was knocked loose. Inspect the inside of your PC closely.

Is your system a pre-built such as a Dell or HP?

Look at the side of power supply. There should be a label showing max wattage and apperage of each voltage. If you don't run a graphics card then you will only need the max wattage.
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#5
wreekhavoc

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It's an HP. I checked the inside but really don't know what to look for as far as what could've been knocked loose. I'm guessing I haven't knocked anything loose. The input is 100-127v~7A, (200-240V~4A for European), 60/50Hz. The output is 300W Max. The power supply model is a BESTEC ATX-300-12Z Rev.:BD. I also run a graphics card (I think) if that's what shows whatever games or DVD's I run. Should I replace the power supply and/or the motherboard? If I replace both, is it possible to use the backup recovery disc I made after I purchased the computer? I have a lot of programs that I have a lot of work on. I backed up a little more than half of my files so I guess I'm O.K. with that, I'm just worried about the programs that came with the computer and the ones I've purchased by way of store bought software and downloaded software.
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#6
Titan8990

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I would replace one thing at a time so you don't end up replacing something you really don't have to. I still recommend backing up your files to a friends computer before trying to fix the machine. One thing that you can specifically check on your computer now is the CPU fan. Make sure the heatsink is secure.

I recommend this PSU: http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817256019.

Edited by Titan8990, 19 September 2007 - 05:54 PM.

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#7
123Runner

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I plugged in the AC cord and the LED light starts flashing


Is this the LED on the mother board?
Do you hear the fans on the power supply turning/ running?

The symptoms due point to the psu, and 300 watts is not much in this day and age.

As suggested, put your HD in a friends to get the data, just to be safe. Do you have another psu you can borrow? from a friend?
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#8
wannabe1

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Hello wreekhavoc...

The flashing led below the AC line in connector is indicative of a failed PSU. HP and Sony both used power supplies with this feature in some models. Replacing the power supply should get you back up and running. When you replace it, give yourself at least another 100 watts...as was mentioned earlier, 300 watts is not much power these days.

wannabe1
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#9
wreekhavoc

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I would replace one thing at a time so you don't end up replacing something you really don't have to. I still recommend backing up your files to a friends computer before trying to fix the machine. One thing that you can specifically check on your computer now is the CPU fan. Make sure the heatsink is secure.

I recommend this PSU: http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817256019.



Don't laugh, what and where is the heatsink located. The fan seams to be secure but it doesn't come on. Thanks for the link to the power supply but I already ordered the same model # power supply because I wasn't sure if I could put any other kind in. At this time I don't have another computer to hook up to other than a laptop.

Thanks for the other comments also, I'm new at understanding the inside of the computer so forgive my ignorance. The power supply that I ordered should arrive by Tuesday. Will this be easy to install? How will i know if the problem is beyond the power supply?
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#10
wannabe1

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The fan seams to be secure but it doesn't come on

Are you talking about the fan in the same area as the blinking LED?

The power supply will be pretty easy...just four screws in the rear and some cables to switch. Just be attentive and it should go quite quickly. I'm fairly confident that this will get you running again.
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#11
wreekhavoc

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The fan seams to be secure but it doesn't come on

Are you talking about the fan in the same area as the blinking LED?

The power supply will be pretty easy...just four screws in the rear and some cables to switch. Just be attentive and it should go quite quickly. I'm fairly confident that this will get you running again.



My CPU has three fans. One for the Power Supply, One sits on some silver thing on top of the motherboard and one in the back of the CPU. they all seem to be secure but they don't come on when I plug in the power cord. When the power supply I ordered arrives, we shall see. I do know that before this problem happened the LED light for the power supply would be steady and when I hit the power on/off button on the front of the CPU the computer would boot up.
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#12
wreekhavoc

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The fan seams to be secure but it doesn't come on

Are you talking about the fan in the same area as the blinking LED?

The power supply will be pretty easy...just four screws in the rear and some cables to switch. Just be attentive and it should go quite quickly. I'm fairly confident that this will get you running again.



My replacement Power Supply arrived yesterday. I won't be able to install it until This afternoon or Saturday night. Is there anything I should know or look out for?
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#13
wreekhavoc

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I managed to install the new Power Supply. Everything seems to be back to normal. Thanks to Titan8990, 123Runner and wannabe1 for all your help. A friend told me this could've happened because of a blown fuse in the Power Supply. Is this true and would it be worth it to take the old power supply unit in for a repair? Thanks again.
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#14
Titan8990

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As a general rule it is best not to attempt to fix a power supply. It only cost you $40 for a new power supply that is of better quality than your old one. I'm sure that a repair shop would be comparable to that price. Power supplies can keep your computer safe or put it at risk. I don't recommend taking the chance with a PSU that has already failed.


Glad to help :).

Edited by Titan8990, 29 September 2007 - 12:29 PM.

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#15
wreekhavoc

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I see. Well again, thanks for your help. Given the problems I had with my PC this year, it's driving me to want to build my own system. So I'll be checking in from tme to time to get some tips on how to do so. This is my second PC. The first one has the same problem of a flashing LED light but it's the light under the on/off button in front of the PC. I didn't want to spend the money repairing it so I just used that to help get this one.

Edited by wreekhavoc, 30 September 2007 - 02:59 PM.

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