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How do destroy a memord card and a phone


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#16
joesquire

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i bet, this person is being investigated by the police, and don't want them to get any data from the phone or memory card, because theres evidence on it that will count against them
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#17
Facedown98

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Well, joesquire, lets not jump to conclusions.

This reasoning might however, prevent us from assisting the user in destroying the memory module.

Can we please here from other forum officials?
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#18
joesquire

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there isnt any other reason i can think of other than that....this person obviously has something to hide at least

Edited by joesquire, 07 October 2007 - 12:34 PM.

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#19
Adrenalin

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wow, very interesting, never thought about that. Like facedown98 said, let's not jump to conculsions here... could be anything.
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#20
joesquire

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yeah fair enough, i shouldnt really judge
sorry =D
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#21
Johanna

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The phone company knows what numbers were called, received, length of the calls, and, what cell towers were used, which gives an approximate location of where the calls were made or received. The phone company also knows every voice mail, text mail, web access, GPS info etc etc. In other words, your jealous girlfriend cannot get anything on you, but a ticked off policeman with a warrant can. Joesquire- let's not idly speculate why this user is so intent on his non-existant privacy. The rest of you, remember nothing you do on the net (or your cell phone) is private. Do not do anything you don't want to discuss with parents, teachers, your pastor, employer or spouse.
Johanna
My daddy always said. "Never write what you can say, never say what you can nod your head to."
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#22
wannabe1

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As Johanna has correctly stated, all information that Law Enforcement would require is available to them through the phone's service provider. This information is tied to the phone number, so everything ever done using this number is available and is not limited to just the actual handset, but all of the handsets ever tied to this number.

Destroying the handset's components will effectively protect any information stored on it from J.Q. Public, but any law enforcement agency with a warrant will have access to all pertinent information.
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#23
hellodave123

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I have to say this is making me laugh. Seems all the conspiracy theorists have decided to set up camp here. Not that I'm obligated to answer the rather over-exaggerated speculation, but it's nothing even close to illegal info as someone coined it. It's just something I'd rather not have shared, anyone with a girlfriend and a camera phone will understand the worries. Yes, I am very paranoid and don't need to go to these lengths but, hey, thats my prerogative.

It's worrying to think that a person can't seek help without speculation about their motives.
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#24
Johanna

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You are welcome. Have a wonderful day!
Johanna
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#25
Facedown98

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What seems more worrying are the lengths you will go through to get rid of them.

Anyway, take a quick moment and think about the situation. Any reason we shouldn't wonder?

I think we've finished here, have we not?

You are welcome. Have a wonderful day!


(Post edited for grammar)

Edited by Facedown98, 07 October 2007 - 06:12 PM.

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#26
starjax

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It's worrying to think that a person can't seek help without speculation about their motives.



If you had explained from the beginning, we probably wouldn't have made a big deal about it. However, As a very large site that deals with security issues, we see a lot of interesting stuff that comes through here. Some of it is out right obvious or admitted to that they are trying to hide something illegal. Others are simply embarrased. Yet others try and obscure the truth. Either way, we have to make a determination and clarification. This enables us to provide, you, the end user, the appropriate help.

The average user won't go to the effort to "retrieve" erased info from a memory card. Less know how to remove the info, much less retrieve it from a phone. People store a large amount of personal info on pda's/cell phones now days. If you delete your contacts, call history, notes, pictures, ect from the phone... The average user will not be able to recover them. In fact, it would take some know how, parts, time, and effort. Not something someone can do in a few min if they found the phone on the street.

Short answer: physical destruction of storage medium is the surest way to erase information. Certain protocols won't allow hdd's and other storage medums (memory cards, thumb drivers, floppies, cd-r's) to leave the premise. They must be run through a industrial shredder.

I hope this explains our position.
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