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Light bulb burning since 1901


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#1
frantique

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Today you'll find a remarkable light bulb burning bright at a fire station in Livermore, California. It hasn't been turned off since 1901.

The Guiness Book of World Records, Ripley's Believe It Or Not and General Electric agree the bulb, of unknown wattage, is the longest-living in history, despite two moves and a few power outages during it's lifetime.

Read more here.
Source: Snopes.com
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#2
**Brian**

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Today you'll find a remarkable light bulb burning bright at a fire station in Livermore, California. It hasn't been turned off since 1901.

The Guiness Book of World Records, Ripley's Believe It Or Not and General Electric agree the bulb, of unknown wattage, is the longest-living in history, despite two moves and a few power outages during it's lifetime.

Read more here.
Source: Snopes.com

AWESOME!!

Frantique - I wonder what kind of bulb that is - if that thing has been ON since 1901, she would be a pretty tough bulb :) Interesting that it would be in a firestation :)

Brian
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#3
dsenette

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there's even a BulbCam....wonder where the "paint drying" or "grass growing" cameras are?
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#4
Chopin

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Nice bulb! I need one of those, but I'd assume the energy bills would be a bit more expensive! What the heck is it made of?
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#5
zorba the geek

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Nice bulb! I need one of those, but I'd assume the energy bills would be a bit more expensive! What the heck is it made of?

In 1877, the American Charles Francis Brush manufactured some carbon arcs to light a public square in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. These arcs were used on a few streets, in a few large office buildings, and even some stores. Electric lights were only used by a few people.

The inventor Thomas Alva Edison (in the USA) experimented with thousands of different filaments to find just the right materials to glow well and be long-lasting. In 1879, Edison discovered that a carbon filament in an oxygen-free bulb glowed but did not burn up for 40 hours. Edison eventually produced a bulb that could glow for over 1500 hours.

Lewis Howard Latimer (1848-1928) improved the bulb by inventing a carbon filament (patented in 1881); Latimer was a member of Edison's research team, which was called "Edison's Pioneers." In 1882, Latimer developed and patented a method of manufacturing his carbon filaments.

In 1903, Willis R. Whitney invented a treatment for the filament so that it wouldn't darken the inside of the bulb as it glowed. In 1910, William David Coolidge (1873-1975) invented a tungsten filament which lasted even longer than the older filaments. The incandescent bulb revolutionized the world. :)
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#6
dsenette

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Vital Statistics: The improved incandescent lamp, invented by Adolphe A. Chaillet, was made by the Shelby Electric Company. It is a handblown bulb with carbon filament. Approximate wattage-4 watts. Left burning continuously in firehouse as a nightlight over the fire trucks.


and just to make ScHwErV angry (if he ever reads this thread) here's a Wikipedia reference that coincides with the above info
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#7
admin

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Does a lightbulb that has been lit for over a hundred years really need a webcam that updates every 10 seconds?
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#8
frantique

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It would probably be because they want to mark the exact time (within 10 seconds) that it goes out :)
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#9
Tal

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Hmm, I wonder what it's made from.

Anyone wants to calculate the exact electric bill for it? :)
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#10
dsenette

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landlord...look up a couple of posts....it's got the wattage and the general construction info of the bulb
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#11
Tal

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Why, 3714240 watts in total, unless my calculations have gone wrong? :)
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#12
Chopin

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Nice bulb! I need one of those, but I'd assume the energy bills would be a bit more expensive! What the heck is it made of?

In 1877, the American Charles Francis Brush manufactured some carbon arcs to light a public square in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. These arcs were used on a few streets, in a few large office buildings, and even some stores. Electric lights were only used by a few people.

The inventor Thomas Alva Edison (in the USA) experimented with thousands of different filaments to find just the right materials to glow well and be long-lasting. In 1879, Edison discovered that a carbon filament in an oxygen-free bulb glowed but did not burn up for 40 hours. Edison eventually produced a bulb that could glow for over 1500 hours.

Lewis Howard Latimer (1848-1928) improved the bulb by inventing a carbon filament (patented in 1881); Latimer was a member of Edison's research team, which was called "Edison's Pioneers." In 1882, Latimer developed and patented a method of manufacturing his carbon filaments.

In 1903, Willis R. Whitney invented a treatment for the filament so that it wouldn't darken the inside of the bulb as it glowed. In 1910, William David Coolidge (1873-1975) invented a tungsten filament which lasted even longer than the older filaments. The incandescent bulb revolutionized the world. :)


zorba has been contradicting himself.

All objects in the world can be placed into one of two categories:

- things that need to be fixed,
- things that will need to be fixed after you've had a few minutes to play with them

I think the lightbulb would qualify as a few hundred years, but if 55713610 minutes count as a few, then consider this post ignored :)

*Fredil Yupigo hides in the corner

And landlord, that seems reasonable :)
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#13
Tal

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Right, now I need to find out our cost per watt. Mind you, it's very expensive here :)

Edited by landlord, 16 November 2007 - 06:29 AM.

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#14
zorba the geek

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zorba has been contradicting himself.

All objects in the world can be placed into one of two categories:

- things that need to be fixed,
- things that will need to be fixed after you've had a few minutes to play with them


things that need to be fixed:brocken or not working for some reason

things that will need to be fixed after zorba had a few minutes to play with themThere are a lot of products out there,labeld Rustproof,Waterproof,Bulletproof,Shatterproof,Fireproof....Foulproof............
..........,but have you ever seen a
product that claims to be *zorbaproof*?!
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#15
Tal

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I hear you Zorba, oh I hear you :)

Many times I have ruined expensive gadgets that get into my hands :) Since then, people act with caution when showing me their new gadgets :)
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