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#1
aWaz

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Hello,
I am not very expierenced in an area of upgrading desktops. I have a compaq presario SR2039X with 1gb (2 chips of 512mb) of DDR PC3200 ram. I found a really good deal on a 2gb (2x1gb) PC2-5300 DDR2 667 mhz memory kit. I am wondering if those two modules would be compatible with my current memory or would it just mess up my computer :) Thanks
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#2
Zakilla

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DDR2 memory modules arent compatible with your system so you will need to buy a DDR (184-pin) memory modules. Ill see what I can try to find. Mean while you might wanna look at newegg.com or tigerdirect.com which have very nice prices.( but right now many online stores servers are down due to high demand from black friday shoppers)

Here are the specs from your motherboard
  • Dual-channel memory architecture
  • 4 DDR1 DIMM (184-pin) sockets
  • PC3200/PC2700 DDR1 DIMMs
  • Non-ECC memory only
  • Maximum memory: 4 x 1 GB DDR1 DIMMs, 4.0 GB total

Edited by Zakilla, 23 November 2007 - 11:03 AM.

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#3
aWaz

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Thankts a lot. I am dissapointed that my system does not suppost ddr2 memory. :) I will check for other deals.
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#4
aWaz

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BTW what does dual channel and DIMM mean? And what brand is the best? Thanks

Edited by aWaz, 23 November 2007 - 11:30 AM.

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#5
Zakilla

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DIMM- Stands for dual in-line memory module it allows a larger transfer of data then a single in-line memory module.
Dual Channel- Two or four memory modules of the exact same size and speed working in parallel to increase memory performance.
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#6
Zakilla

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I dont know how much your willing to spend but here are some choices.
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16820227210
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16820231047

Edited by Zakilla, 23 November 2007 - 03:51 PM.

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#7
gambLe1109

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Honestly, I think you'd be better off upgrading your motherboard so that you can buy better memory in the future, adding another GB of DDR isn't going to do much, and if you're using an outdated motherboard, then most of your other parts are probably outdated too, making a memory upgrade just about useless. In my opinion it would be a waste of money. You should think about buying a new motherboard, or at least list your system specs here so we can see what there is to work with. If you need help finding a motherboard suitable to your needs just ask.
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#8
aWaz

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Hey. My system specs are:
AMD Athlon™ 64 Processor 3700+
CPU Speed 2.20 GHz
Ram: 958.5 MB
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce 6150 LE (256.0 MB)

BTW I have another question. How bad is my video card since I am having trouble running some games?
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#9
gambLe1109

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The video card is not very good at all. It looks like an onboard video card actually, because your RAM seems to be being used up by the video card. What kind of Power Supply do you have? Brand and Wattage please, because I would recommend a video card to you but I need to know how powerful your PSU is.

Edited by gambLe1109, 23 November 2007 - 02:13 PM.

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#10
aWaz

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Thanks for reply. How do I determine the psu?
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#11
kamille316

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Thanks for reply. How do I determine the psu?

You'll have to open your case and look at the sticker that's on the power supply. The brand and wattage should be printed on that sticker.

Kamille
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#12
aWaz

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The brand is Hipro and max output power is 300W.
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#13
gambLe1109

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Ok, if you want a new video card you're going to have to get a better power supply as well. I have an nVidia 6600GT and it's only running at half of it's potential because I only have a 300W PSU, but will soon be replaced with a 500W PSU. What kind of games are you playing? If they're 2 years old or more, then a nVidia 7900GS or something similar would suffice, and more than likely let you run games like Counter-Strike: Source or Doom 3 at 100FPS. To be on the safe side, I wouldn't get anything less than 500-600W if you're buying new.

Edited by gambLe1109, 24 November 2007 - 10:44 AM.

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#14
Troy

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I have an nVidia 6600GT and it's only running at half of it's potential because I only have a 300W PSU, but will soon be replaced with a 500W PSU.

I'm sorry, but I can't agree with this comment. A smaller power supply will not just nicely "limit" the potential of components, at least - you run the risk of burning out your power supply, at worst - you could ruin your whole system. Unfortunately, there's a whole lot more to power supplies than just the wattage.
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