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Sound and amplifiers


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#1
Seltox

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I have two vintage Pioneer speakers that I would like to get running off of my computer. I had them set up previously through an amplifier with a 3.5mm to 2 RCA cable (3.5mm plugging into my computers audio output, 2 RCA going into the Pioneer SX-5000 amplifier). The two speakers then plugged into the amplifier (using the copper stuff or whatever, not sure exactly what it is).

Unfortunately, the amplifier died the other day, overheated and something on one of the cards inside died. The smell was horrible :).

So i was just wondering if there's some sort of converter thing or something to allow me to easily use these speakers through my computer. Perhaps a sound card that could be of use (I'm using my motherboards integrated sound).

~Seltox


EDIT: If it's anyhelp, I just looked at the speakers, says their model is "CS-100A" and they seem to have been released in 1977.

Edited by Seltox, 28 December 2007 - 04:35 AM.

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#2
Adrenalin

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Hi Seltox,

I'm no expert on this by any means, but your PC would then act as an Amplifier. I'm not sure if this would use alot of power or something but I doubt it.

What I do know is that I have a splitter that splits my one audio channel into two, now, you do also get a cable that plugs into the PC, then turns into a dual RCA connection. I tried looking up on google what type of plugs your speakers have however I did not find any pictures of them [maybe I didn't look hard enough].

I'm pretty sure you can do this, even if it means having a few 'odd' pieces of cable put together :)
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#3
Seltox

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The speakers don't have "plugs" on them. They're just wire that you plug into like a stereo system thing. That's what's causing my the problems
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#4
james_8970

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Any of the higher end sound cards should suit your needs, I myself am just becoming an audiophile, so I don't know heaps of information regarding this....
Though I'm thinking a sound card such as the AuzenTech X-FI Prelude, should fit the bill.
I plan on buying this card with the Z-5500's in late 2008 (if nothing better comes out), it truly is a great sound card.

You could also go with something much cheaper like the Xtreme Audio or Xtreme gamer from creative, though those RCA cables should connect to you onboard sound card just fine.
James

Edited by james_8970, 28 December 2007 - 11:47 PM.

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#5
stettybet0

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I think that everyone that has answered you thus far has misunderstood your question. With all due respect to them, I think you should disregard their answers.

You are saying that these speakers are the old type which only have copper wire hookups, correct? The type where you literally wrap copper wire around little prongs on the speaker? If that is the case, buying a new sound card won't help the situation. What I'd recommend (if you cannot find a 3.5mm to copper wire... which I've never heard of) is to simply buy new speakers! You can get a good set for around $50.
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