Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

New to mac


  • Please log in to reply

#1
RobSoko315

RobSoko315

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
Hey guys,

I've just recently purchased a macbook pro. Previously I've been used to PCs.

I was just wondering if there are security precautions I should take with my mac and if there are any programs to download to help prevent and scan for spyware, viruses etc.

The "Apple Geniuses" say there's no need for such software, but since I'm a long time PC user, I can't believe them.

Please help

Thanks



Robert :)
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
peterm

peterm

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 3,173 posts
Hi Robert
The "Apple Geniuses" are right
I run apple at work and we get files from everyone - no protection - no trouble.
I run PC & Mac at home protection pc none on mac
Cheers
Peterm
  • 0

#3
Josiah

Josiah

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 192 posts
Yes, although there are no current security threats for the mac, that doesn't mean their couldn't be. Although, I don't run any security software on my mac that doesn't mean it isn't a good idea preparing for a future threat. Not to mention if you have pc's in your home or if you have friends who have pc's and for example you forward a email with a virus to a pc the pc will still get the virus, but the mac will be unaffected. So, what are the options. You can always run Norton or Macafee for the mac or their is a free antivirus for the mac called http://www.clamxav.com/

Also, if you want to you can run the built in osx firewall or you can run a third party firewall like http://www.obdev.at/...s/littlesnitch/

Good luck with your new mac... I am just a little jealous being a video editing kind-of guy.
  • 0

#4
pyrocajun2707

pyrocajun2707

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 52 posts
Those Apple "Geniuses" are obviously nothing but mindless pawns in Apple's fanatical long-shot campaign to control the realms of both hardware and software. They only told you protection isn't necessary because they want you to actually believe that their precious OS X is as perfect and impenetrable as their ridiculous ad campaigns claim.

Don't get me wrong, OS X is a good OS if you overlook the fact that it's a pretty shell thrown over a stripped-down open-source BSD kernel that they still manage to sell for $130.

Apple hardware is well-made, especially the notebooks.


BUUUUUUUUUUT.... Don't think for a SECOND that you're perfectly safe in that blanket of ignorance the "geniuses" try to wrap around you. While NO operating system is completely safe, OS X is known among serious hackers for having obvious, gaping security holes and pathetically under-developed anti-malware systems. OS X is perceived as secure because most malicious software is written for Windows, since it holds the largest market share, and most serious hackers could care less about whatever information the average mac user is concealing. There is, however, malicious software written for OS X, and there are some hackers out there who are well-versed in UNIX and can root your system in a matter of minutes. Trust me; I know a dude who does it. I've seen him bring an iMac to its knees in about an hour.

Here's a good free antivirus you can install. I actually find it better than most of the anti-viruses people insist on paying so much for. http://avast.com/eng...ac-edition.html

Edited by pyrocajun2707, 13 February 2008 - 02:42 AM.

  • 0

#5
JeffIsHereToo

JeffIsHereToo

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
Let me start by saying the Mac OS is not invulnerable! No one, not even Apple, has said that. So let's start from there. Now, having said that in all these years, other than a few "proof-of-concept" hacks, most of which BTW used published and fixed exploits, there have been no "in the wild" viruses, trojans, or malware. Again not saying there never will be but in the years since OS X was released there have been NONE.

So...

I will disagree with those that say you should run out and buy an anti-virus package. Why? Because these things are historically resource intensive, they slow things down, they add another layer of complexity with that layer of security. They're for now adding no value but sucking up your $$$ with subscriptions etc.

But what if...

Now this means you need to be smart and keep up on what's going on. You can be sure the day a real Mac virus is found it will be ALL over the net and on your nightly news. I'm not kidding! I guarantee it will make the CNN front page! If and when that happens you should pre prepared, as well all need to be, to go purchase some form of protection. You also need to be smart with what you download and run. While technically not a virus or trojan, someone could create a program that says it does one thing yet does another. So only download from sources you know and trust. Don't get fooled with phishing web sites, etc.

These are just a few of many preventative measures you can take to make sure you're not the first one to get the first Mac virus...though when I think about it that would be kinda cool! LOL!

Back up important documents and always be ready, if ever needed, to erase and reinstall. If you can say you can do that at the drop of a hat your data is safe and you can forgo the drain of these parasitic programs that have slowed down and caused issues on PC's for years.
  • 0

#6
JeffIsHereToo

JeffIsHereToo

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Here's a good free antivirus you can install. I actually find it better than most of the anti-viruses people insist on paying so much for. http://avast.com/eng...ac-edition.html


Note: This program, which seems pretty good, is not free. You can download and try it for free but to keep it updated you need to purchase a subscription for $39.

BTW: Even their marketing says it's mostly directed to "stopping malware threats being passed on to PC's in your office, particularly more vunerable Microsoft OS platforms."

Funny...no thanks I'm not spending money to protect Windows users. They're already running virus protection...right?

Edited by JeffIsHereToo, 24 February 2008 - 12:27 PM.

  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP