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How to use anti static wrist strap?


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#16
zburns

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I am a new member and unfamiliar with using the site. Just made a quick reply and not sure it posted.

Regards: Fred and any others saying it is ok to leave computer case plugged in while working inside it.

ABSOLUTELY, NEVER, EVER STICK YOUR HAND(S) INTO A OPEN COMPUTER CASE WITH THE COMPUTER CASE PLUGGED IN -- REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT THE COMPUTER CASE POWER SWITCH IS ON OR OFF.

Not only hazardous shock possible but a dangerous if not fatal possibility. There always exist the remote possibility of a wall plug being wired backwards or be dirty, wet, moist and therefore "a leakage possible condition" causing trouble.

The power supply will have residual voltage on its output When the case is unplugged or the power switch is turned off. This residual voltage will discharge fully in a short time -- so give it several minutes. ZBURNS
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#17
hfcg

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I am a new member and unfamiliar with using the site. Just made a quick reply and not sure it posted.

Regards: Fred and any others saying it is ok to leave computer case plugged in while working inside it.

ABSOLUTELY, NEVER, EVER STICK YOUR HAND(S) INTO A OPEN COMPUTER CASE WITH THE COMPUTER CASE PLUGGED IN -- REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT THE COMPUTER CASE POWER SWITCH IS ON OR OFF.

Not only hazardous shock possible but a dangerous if not fatal possibility. There always exist the remote possibility of a wall plug being wired backwards or be dirty, wet, moist and therefore "a leakage possible condition" causing trouble.

The power supply will have residual voltage on its output When the case is unplugged or the power switch is turned off. This residual voltage will discharge fully in a short time -- so give it several minutes. ZBURNS

This is correct.
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#18
Mr. Novice

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WOW! Isn't Google great! I just bought a static wrist strap and it occurred to me I had no way of knowing for sure where to connect the alligator clip end. So I googled the question and ouala, theres Plutox asking the same question on this awesome site "Geeks to Go". I not only got a great answer but also felt like I got a broader lesson on static discharge. I most appreciate everyone's contribution to my hunger for knowledge, especially Jeff's post at the end. My memopry upgrade went fine.

I look forward to GeektoGo.com in the future. :)

Mr. Novice
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#19
reconman

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I have a few of these wrist straps and was wondering if they are even necessary to use if I'm building a computer from scratch, meaning none of the parts have ever been used (except maybe when tested at the factory.) Would there still be a static charge emitted from certain hardware?
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#20
Titan8990

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How new the hardware is will not matter. The static discharge comes from your body, not the device. Not everyone uses the wrist straps. I never have. But it is a more effective way of preventing ESD than constantly grounding yourself on the chassis.
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#21
cvswebdesign

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Not only hazardous shock possible but a dangerous if not fatal possibility. There always exist the remote possibility of a wall plug being wired backwards or be dirty, wet, moist and therefore "a leakage possible condition" causing trouble.


I can't help it.....this is kinda funny to me. I searched for about 10 minutes on Google to find a case where someone was killed by their computer frying their hiney. Of course....what did I find....a few stories to share!!
http://www.engadget....uted-by-his-pc/
I can't confirm the validity of any of these....but I can say....it "might" happen. Now....I wouldn't go out and buy anti-static pads to put under every PC I own....but I definately use caution inside my cases.

I run liquid cooling in a few rigs I have....and have had the mis-fortune of a leaking system (never use the stock cooling block with a Thermaltake system)....if you're intelligent...you will get non-conductive coolant.......I became intelligent after my first adventure with a smoking video card!!!!

Last but not least.....once you remove the power coard from the PSU....press the POWER SWITCH on the front of your PC....it will discharge any extra juice in the system....now you have a completely dead mobo.....you can do anything necessary. I ran a Marine Corps IT Team for 12 years....my new guys were issued a small screwdriver set...and anti-static equipment....I never cared if they lost a screwdriver....but if they lost any of their anti-static equipment...I would wear them out!!!!!!!!!!!!

Carl
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#22
Titan8990

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That article is followed by some very cruel comments...
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#23
bdlt

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please disconnect the power cord before opening the chassis

please read post #14 before touching ANY components

please google for 'esd'(or electrostatic discharge) before doing anything

here's a site:

http://www.pccompute...com/esd/esd.htm

Edited by bdlt, 14 April 2008 - 09:51 PM.

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#24
jones2k

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Hi,

Can anyone explain to me why you only need yourself and the case to be at the same potential? Wouldn't a possible charge still be there making you able damage video cards etc. since these could be charged differently (possibly no charge at all if they are brand new)?

Or have I missed something? :)
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#25
howdy there

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What if your computer is mounted in a plastic or plexiglas case?
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#26
123Runner

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If its plastic, then ground yourself to something metal.

The main points through all of the discussion are:
1. Ground yourself to the case. As stated you are actually putting yourself at the same potential as the case. It is a false assumption that you are sending the "static charge" to ground. The damage comes from the difference in potential between you and the component. With no potential difference, there is no charge to dissipate, and no damage.
2. ESD straps work good because they are a good habit to get in to.
3. Keeping your body in contact with the case will also work. This is providing you stay in contact and you do not shuffle your feet on the carpet.
4. Carpets are a bad idea for a room if you are working on computers. That is why there are anti-static mats.
5. Turn off the computer power. Unplug it from the wall. This will stop any power being in the computer. Some computers do not have PSU power switches. A lot of computers will keep 5vdc on the board (this is indicated by the light you will sometimes see).
6. Always handle any ram, component, drive, board, etc by the edges. This minimizes any contact with the actual component.

I personally switch between the strap and my arm in contact with the case. If a customer is present and watching I will always use the strap. They know what a grounding cord is, but do not realize that touching (and staying in contact) with the case is the same.
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#27
rshaffer61

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The case is not the issue but the fact is your body will hold a charge. By touching something metal you ground yourself. Since your case is not metal then the recommended step is to touch something metal to discharge yourself right before touching any internal part of the case.
It takes very little static electricity to damage internal components.
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#28
brightspot

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I have a slightly different problem. The electricity in my body is so strong that I fry computers just by using them. My computers never last more than two years and start doing strange things after about a year. Because of this I should to wear a strap to use one. I just bought a new laptop and want to start out right. I bought a strap, but I don't know where to attatch the clip to just use the computer. Should I get an antistatic mat to clip it to? I would like this computer to last a little longer than average for me, lol.
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#29
claybv

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I have to agree with 'Jeffk813'. The static issue is the static balance between you the parts and computer chassis. Not true ground.
Most people without straps have to keep constant hand on parts and chassis.

The PSU having power cord still poses issue. Even motherboard still has power when PC is powered down. If PSU has 'SHORT' or faulty PSU, it can still cause Life threatening Shock! power switch(PSU switch) being off can still pose electric shock issue if wall outlet, building wiring, or faulty power source. As power switch on PSU only controls 'one leg' of power wires, meaning if power source is faulty or wired backwards, You may get the shock of your life!

Again, ESD is balance between equipment and You. Carpet static control is a plus!
It is better to be safe than sorry!
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#30
claybv

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Static electricity is a issue with positive electrons and negative electrons. When you have more electrons than the computer, parts, desk, or other conductive object, it will try to balance than electron level to the balanced level. Or Vice-Versa. Not the same 'charge' as a battery or power source, in this respect. The electrons between you and devices will try to 'equal out' or 'balance'. This causes a 'surge' of electrons(static electricity).

The 'surge' is the static shock culprit.
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