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CD and DVD Speeds


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#1
waynf

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I have in front of me a DVD+RW indicating up to 4x, A DVD-R indicating 8x and a CD-R indicating 1x-52x.

Would someone explain to me what this "x" business is all about, and why are they all different., What does the "x" stand for and which ones are for what, data, music, videos, etc.

waynf
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#2
hfcg

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Hello,
The X is for times (as in multiplication).
The original speed that a disc could be read/write was very slow by todays standards.
Newer drives rate the speed in multiples of the original speed @ X (times), 4 X (times), Etc...
This is only related to speed. the quality of music, video, Etc... is dependant on the quality of the drive, and disc.

Edited by hfcg, 16 March 2008 - 02:29 PM.

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#3
waynf

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Now what has this got to do with Nero's ability to control drive read spead?
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#4
Neil Jones

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Now what has this got to do with Nero's ability to control drive read spead?


It doesn't.
Nero's ability to control drive read speed is nothing to do with the writing speed.

The speeds on the disks (4x, 52x, etc) are the theoretical maximum writing speeds. In reality you'll probably find most disks won't burn at the top speeds without generating a load of coasters (media that is essentially useless because its half-burnt) so you have to slow it down to burn it successfully.
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