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Computer keeps turning off


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#1
wilmywilm

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Hi all

I hope you can help me.

My PC keeps turning off without warning. I have cleaned out the heatsink and all of the fans in the case and in the PSU. It would usually turn off just after starting Windows but sometimes it has turned off during start up. Once it even turned off when I was checking the CPU temps etc in BIOS before loading Windows, the temp was 36 C when it happened. I have just reformatted the hard drive thinking is was a software fault and the PC stayed on for about two hours without turning off while it was doing this. But when it was reloading windows for the first time, it turned off again! After reading some of the threads on this forum, I think maybe it could be a PSU problem.

What do you think it could be?

Many thanks

Wilmywilm :)
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#2
snooker

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Hi , It could be almost anything without an error report , though I would just have the basic hook up , one stick of ram if possible , keyboard and mouse . I would have the bios set to default . Who knows what you did afterwards with the CPU . It can even be the power supply . its hard to tell unless you test them .
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#3
wytboy55

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it could be any hardware components inside the system. Could be the processor, memory, heatsink or PSU. So snooker's suggestion is a good idea. Or I suggest i remove everything first inside the CPU. remove all memory, all the drives (cd drives, hard drive), all the extension cards (PCI, PCI-e, internal modem, AGP). If all the inside components are not attached anymore, try to turn on the system. Of course you might hear a beep sound (because memory is not attached). And if the system still shuts down with just the processor and the PSU alone are plugged in. It could be the heatsink, processor or the PSU already. If the computer did not shut down. Attached the components one by one for you to figure out whats causing the problem.
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#4
Artellos

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I think you're right that your PSU might be failing.
For checking the voltages of your power supply please download Everest here.
Once downloaded follow the steps below.
  • Open Everest Home Edition.
  • Click "Computer" in the left menu.
  • In the box to the right there will be some options. Click "Sensors".
  • With this screen open, make sure you can see all the voltages then press the "Print Screen" button.
  • Open something like Paint and press "CTRL + V". Click File -> Save As...
  • Save the picture as a .JPG file.
  • Then upload the picture onto your next reply.

Regards,
Olrik

Edited by Artellos, 27 May 2008 - 02:13 AM.

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#5
wilmywilm

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Thank you for your suggestions.

The PC won't stay on long enough for it to reload windows, it keeps turning off at the same point. During set-up it turns off when you are asked to select your input language. So I cannot use Everest at the moment.

If I recall correctly, the voltages were ok, just a little bit above required (say 0.1V).

I'm thinking of taking out the motherboard to ensure that there is nothing that could cause a short-circuit on the underside and then rebuild the PC whilst checking all the cables and connectors.

Would the increase in processor use increase the current required from the PSU thus causing it to turn off thus indicating a fault with the PSU? Is there a way of measuring the current drawn from the PSU? Or should I just get a new PSU and try it?
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#6
Artellos

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You can use a electric measureing device to test the PSU yourself (If you know how to.)
I'm pretty sure google can offer some aditional information.

Make sure you ground yourself properly before you take apart the computer and start touching certain components because computer parts can't take that much voltage.

Regards,
Olrik
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