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Can't access IE on main PC?


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#1
leeo5150

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:) Good morning. I am a complete newbie to this site, so please be patient with me if I seem to know 'next to nothing'. In our house we have a Dell Deminsion 8200 desktop PC hooked up to high speed cable connection. From there it goes into a wireless router which provides internet to our 2 laptops. The laptops will connect and function perfectly to IE7. The desktop, however, will not connect to the internet at all. It only shows 'internet cannot display the webpage'. I have tried reinstalling the CDs from the laptops (the desktop is an older PC), doing a system restore, anything I can think of. It almost seems as if the driver (if there is one) is gone from this system.

I have an 11 year old ready to kill me if I don't get her back on the net! Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Lee
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#2
Fenor

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Hi leeo5150! Welcome to G2G!

On the desktop with the problem, go to START-->RUN and type: devmgmt.msc. The Device Manager window will open. Are there any items listed that have a yellow ! or ? next to it?

Fenor
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#3
leeo5150

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I just went and checked; everything looks normal. Nothing in yellow or with a ! or ? beside it. Thanks.
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#4
Fenor

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Go to START-->RUN and type ipconfig and post here what it stats for the IP Address, Subnet Mask & Default Gateway.
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#5
leeo5150

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Hi again. I just went and tried your suggestion and apparently I have another problem now. When I type in ipconfig and hit the enter button the new window pops open for a nano-second and then closes. I restarted the PC and tried several times but it does the same thing. Instead of opening the new window which shows the info we're looking for, the window opens and closes in less than a second and I'm right back at the main display page?????
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#6
Fenor

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My bad on that. The window opening and closing that way is what should have happened after following the retarded instructions I gave in my last post. :)

Below are the instructions you should follow:

Go to START-->RUN and type cmd. In the new window that opens, type ipconfig and hit ENTER. A bunch of information will display on the screen. The information I want you to post here is the IP Address, Subnet Mask & Default Gateway.

Edited by Fenor, 29 May 2008 - 12:02 PM.

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#7
leeo5150

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You're right, that worked much better. Okay, the ip is 192.168.15.2, the subnet is 255.255.255.0 and the default is 192.168.15.1
Thanks again!
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#8
O/Siris

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You're right, that worked much better. Okay, the ip is 192.168.15.2, the subnet is 255.255.255.0 and the default is 192.168.15.1
Thanks again!

Fenor's probably going to have you do a "ping" next. At the same CMD screen like used for ipconfig, type "ping 192.168.15.1" and hit the enter key. Your result, hopefully, will look similar to:

Pinging 192.168.15.1 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.15.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=255
Reply from 192.168.15.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=255
Reply from 192.168.15.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=255
Reply from 192.168.15.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=255

Ping statistics for 192.168.15.1:

Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),

Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:

Minimum = 1ms, Maximum = 2ms, Average = 1ms

and not like:

Pinging 192.168.15.1 with 32 bytes of data:

Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 192.168.15.1:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),


Or if you get "Destination host unreachable" instead of "Request timed out."

Anyway, the results should provide some guidance, too.
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#9
leeo5150

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I did the ping test and it came back as your first example. The only difference being that in your 4 replies, you have TLL=255. My ping came back with TLL=64. Not sure if that means anything.
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#10
Fenor

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Lets have you try what is referred to as 'Power Cycling' your Cable modem. To do this do the following:
  • Turn off all computers connected to the router
  • Unplug the power cord from the back of the Cable modem and the Router
  • Wait at least 5 minutes
  • Plug in the power cord into the Cable modem and wait at least one minute for it to initialize
  • Plug in the power cord into the Router and again wait at least one minute for it to initialize.
  • Power on one computer and try to connect to the Internet with it.
  • If the one computer can connect to the Internet, then you can start turning on the other computers one-by-one and checking their Internet connection.

If you have DSL, just replace the word 'Cable' with 'DSL' in the above instructions.

Fenor
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#11
O/Siris

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I did the ping test and it came back as your first example. The only difference being that in your 4 replies, you have TLL=255. My ping came back with TLL=64. Not sure if that means anything.


For our purposes, it doesn't. If we were troubleshooting a connection to something remote (i.e. your company's VPN, or something like that), then it might come into play.

Getting time responses at least means your computer sees the gateway. Hmm... that's a possibility. Wrong gateway?

See what happens when you follow Fenor's guidance. I'll defer to Fenor.
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#12
leeo5150

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Good morning again and thanks for all of the help. I powered everything down and then restarted each one at a time. Everything works now; all 3 PCs are connected to the internet. I'm not sure why...I have tried restarting before with no luck?? But the desktop will connect now, however, unlike the 2 laptops it is 'slower than Christmas' as my daughter just said. I'm not sure if that is another part of the issue or just the age of the unit.
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#13
O/Siris

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Good morning again and thanks for all of the help. I powered everything down and then restarted each one at a time. Everything works now; all 3 PCs are connected to the internet. I'm not sure why...I have tried restarting before with no luck?? But the desktop will connect now, however, unlike the 2 laptops it is 'slower than Christmas' as my daughter just said. I'm not sure if that is another part of the issue or just the age of the unit.


So... at least we've made progress. Basically, here, as I understand it, there are five "boxes" involved, right? A cable modem, a router with wireless capability, a desktop PC, and 2 laptops. The laptops are fine, the desktop is connecting now, but slow network response. All correct?

And if so, how again are they connected? Unless I misread, it sounds like you've got the cable modem hooked up to the desktop PC, and then the desktop PC hooked up to the router, which then hooks to the laptops via wireless?

CABLE----DESKTOP---ROUTER --- 2 LAPTOPS (wireless)

Like that?
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#14
leeo5150

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Well, wouldn't you know...no interent this morning. I'll see if I can the connections laid out for you. I may have addd and extra box in my original description. The cable comes in from the wall and plugs into a Netgear 'Wireless Cable Modem Gateway', model CG814WG. From there it connects to the desktop (the problem PC) via ethernet cable. Both laptops connect to this wirelessly (and again, they work fine). So in a nutshell, that's my configuration. Thanks, Lee
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#15
O/Siris

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Lee,

You might need to confirm with your cable company how many PC's you're allowed to have connected. Just to use an example, Comcast only permits me one connection to their cable modem in my house. I use a separate wireless router so the cable modem only sees one connection. Comcast doesn't mind, necessarily, but they only provide tech support on the "registered" PC. That gateway device obviously permits a certain number of wireless and wired connections , but if your cable company only permits two, that would cause the problem (although I would think it wouldn't always block the same PC unless it's looking at MAC addresses, which can be explained later, if necessary).
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