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DHCP problem...


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#1
AlphaMonk

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I have a wrt54g linksys router. I recently got a Wii and was able to go online. (I don't know if this addition is the problem.) I have two other computers connected wirelessly, one with an ethernet cable, plus a xbox 360 (ethernet cable too). I wasn't able to go on XBOX live and when I tested it (360 troubleshooting), it said to make sure I'm DHCP enabled.

I checked and it was. The Maximum Number of DHCP Users is set to 10. I checked my DHCP clients table and it shows all the 3 computers and the Wii. I then clicked DHCP release which deletes the IP addresses and renew DHCP which is supposed to get a new IP address (i duno why I did it). It's on automatic configuration.

The 360 started working. However, I went online with the computers and then I couldn't go online on the 360 again. I did the whole DHCP release again and it works. How do I fix it so I don't have to keep deleting and renewing?

Thanks :)
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#2
Artellos

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Do you know how to look up the size of the DHCP pool?
Can you tell me the number range of this?

It might be that the pool is too small for the ammount of devices so they 'steal' eachothers IP Addresses.

Regards,
Olrik
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#3
AlphaMonk

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Sorry but I don't know how to check. >.<
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#4
dsenette

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I checked and it was. The Maximum Number of DHCP Users is set to 10. I checked my DHCP clients table and it shows all the 3 computers and the Wii. I then clicked DHCP release which deletes the IP addresses and renew DHCP which is supposed to get a new IP address (i duno why I did it). It's on automatic configuration.

i would assume that that's from your router's config page right?


try not having the Wii or one of the computers connected to the network and see if that allows the 360 to connect..

some ISPs have a limit on how many computers you can have accessing a single connection
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#5
Kinkme

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Your main PC and xbox,ps3, etc... should be on static ips anyways. Why are you running them dhcp? Set them static open up the ports and shut down dhcp and lock down all other ips. That way no one can access your network.
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#6
dsenette

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Your main PC and xbox,ps3, etc... should be on static ips anyways.

care to elaborate on that? what's the advantage of NOT having DHCP on ?
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#7
Kinkme

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Your main PC and xbox,ps3, etc... should be on static ips anyways.

care to elaborate on that? what's the advantage of NOT having DHCP on ?



Yea go into your router and turn DHCP OFF. pretty simple. Then limit how many ips you have to the amount you need. Dhcp is a request that your computer sends out across the network asking for an IP address and network settings. If you don't have DHCP enabled then NO computer set to auto grab network settings wont receive a request and receive the network settings. Understand? The advantage is no one can access the network ON your network without the proper ip settings. Plus if you reboot the router you wont have to update your port forward settings to apply the right ips. The last advantage is you will know which boxes ips are tired to without having to look at the DHCP table. You can work on issues and already know what ip you need to fix forward or remove.
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#8
dsenette

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If you don't have DHCP enabled then NO computer set to auto grab network settings wont receive a request and receive the network settings. Understand? The advantage is no one can access the network ON your network without the proper ip settings.

except that you didn't mention changing the router's ip to a different non-standard scheme...90% of all home routers are 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1 ...not too hard to get around...and even if you do change the router's ip...it's not exactly that hard to still get on the network and find out what it is

Plus if you reboot the router you wont have to update your port forward settings to apply the right ips

sure


The last advantage is you will know which boxes ips are tired to without having to look at the DHCP table.

not exactly a difficult thing to do
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#9
Kinkme

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If you don't have DHCP enabled then NO computer set to auto grab network settings wont receive a request and receive the network settings. Understand? The advantage is no one can access the network ON your network without the proper ip settings.

except that you didn't mention changing the router's ip to a different non-standard scheme...90% of all home routers are 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1 ...not too hard to get around...and even if you do change the router's ip...it's not exactly that hard to still get on the network and find out what it is

Agreed, but if your router is set to only 10 ips and the rest of the range has been disabled they wont be able to access even if they use the standard settings. Plus if they do grab one of the static ips you will see a network error on the machine allowing you to know someone is trying to access the network.

Plus if you reboot the router you wont have to update your port forward settings to apply the right ips

sure


The last advantage is you will know which boxes ips are tired to without having to look at the DHCP table.

not exactly a difficult thing to do


It is quite the advantage when you have 100+ boxes your working on and each one has different port and speed settings in the Switch (managed switch I should say) I force some ips down to 128k at the switch to lessen the network traffic and collisions.
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#10
dsenette

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that doesn't exactly apply to this scenario though does it? hardly up to 100+ machines (which is ridiculous to manage with static IPs....though it has it's reasons)...the IP is irrelevant to switch ports too...that's controlled physically (or should be....wire A plugs in to port 1 on switch 1 or whatever)
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#11
dsenette

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for clarification Kinkme....i'm not saying that static IP assignments don't have their place or uses or advantages...i just don't thing your suggestion specifically applies to this issue
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#12
Kinkme

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that doesn't exactly apply to this scenario though does it? hardly up to 100+ machines (which is ridiculous to manage with static IPs....though it has it's reasons)...the IP is irrelevant to switch ports too...that's controlled physically (or should be....wire A plugs in to port 1 on switch 1 or whatever)




Why is it ridiculous to manage? 10000's of networks are Static . All servers are static. When your dealing with clusters and servers you have to use static..... Walk into a data-center you will be hard press to find DHCP running. Static is a good policy even in a simple home network. Think about it. You have tivo, xbox, wii, ps3, your machine. Each one needs different ports opened. Why would you run DHCP when you KNOW each one has different port forward needs? DHCP is for workstations that don't have special needs or options set like a cybercafes or small office that doesnt have a central server.
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#13
dsenette

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Why is it ridiculous to manage? 10000's of networks are Static . All servers are static. When your dealing with clusters and servers you have to use static..... Walk into a data-center you will be hard press to find DHCP running. Static is a good policy even in a simple home network. Think about it. You have tivo, xbox, wii, ps3, your machine. Each one needs different ports opened. Why would you run DHCP when you KNOW each one has different port forward needs? DHCP is for workstations that don't have special needs or options set like a cybercafes or small office that doesnt have a central server.

i'm still going to disagree with you...

yes in a corporate network environment it's best practice to have your servers with static IP addresses (though it's only a requirement for domain controllers...if you've got DNS running then any other server other than a DC can have a dynamic ip with absolutely no issues)

yes in clusters you have to use static ip's because that's how a cluster works...if serverA doesn't know where ServerB is in the cluster for even a second the cluster dies...

ten's of thousands of networks being 100% static assignments might be a stretch...and it's not like we've got statistics to say how many machines are in any of those set ups

actually...for the basic services like xbox live you don't have to open any ports (to my knowledge) in your firewall router for a specific device...you don't have to NAT them at all (wich is what port forwarding is)....all of the connections for xbox live or wii on the internet are OUTBOUND connections...not inbound...you've only got to worry about static ip assignments and full port forwarding when you're worried about IN BOUND connections
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#14
Kinkme

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http://support.microsoft.com/kb/908874 XBOX LIVE

http://www.orpheusin...uk/support/ps3/ PS3

http://www.dvrplaygr...Administration/ TIVO

Torrents normally need open ports too.


Plus is your using remote admin on your home computer you will need to open up ports and use an IP redirect like no-ip.com to point to your external IP.


Trust me Static at home is way better. Beside I live in Florida and we get a lot of rain power outages that knock the router offline forcing a reboot, when it does come back up no need to worry about port forwarding and settings.

Edited by Kinkme, 01 August 2008 - 10:13 AM.

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#15
O/Siris

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http://support.microsoft.com/kb/908874 XBOX LIVe


None of the examples are REQUIRED, unless you're speaking about an inbound connection, just as has already been said. For DHCP, there is another option, depending on the device controlling DHCP: reservations. If you reserve an IP to a device, then it will always get the same IP Address, even though it's set to DHCP. I know of only a few (home) routers that do that, but it's still a way to have the best of both worlds.

I know my XBOX 360 connects to XBOX Live just fine, and without needing any ports opened. I also know I can RDP TO a machine at work no problem. I'd have to open the ports if I wanted to RDP from work to home, though.

Actually, I wonder if the OP is getting DHCP from the router or from the ISP. It COULD be the ISP, which would explain what's happening. On the other hand, he speaks of using controls in the router to release and renew.

I wonder what the OP sees if he does IPCONFIG and looks at the Subnet Mask line. What's the address there?
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