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What exactly is an access point?


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#1
sarahd711

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I'm having trouble getting good signal strength from the side of the house with the router to the other side. The router is set-up in my room, and the laptop that is having trouble connecting is one floor up on the opposite side of the house.

What I think may solve my problem is a wireless access point, but I'm not sure exactly what it is. Is an access point basically a router that I can just put anywhere and it will sort of "catch" the signal so that computers farther away can access it?
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#2
Major Payne

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I would just buy an external wireless antenna. Worked for me on my desktop. They make so many kinds, too, that it's hard to make up your mind what to get. Both your computer and the router might benefir from having a high gain wireless antenna installed. If you have a 2.4GHz wireless, you may be having problems with a cordless phone or similar device operating on or near the same frequency. You could also try changing the channel used to see if it helps, but if it is just a signal strength problem, it wont.

Edited by Major Payne, 25 August 2008 - 11:05 PM.

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#3
Wanderer_of_the_Stars

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I don't really understand what Major Payne stated about buying an external wirless antenna, but I'm pretty sure it means a wireless repeater. Buying a wireless repeater will strengthen your signal just like a wired repeater does.

Another solution is upgrading your antenna. Most routers have a standard antenna but you can replace it with a Hi-gain antenna. Maybe this is what Major Payne meant.

Also, check your router settings to make sure the max range is being broadcasted. Maybe just increasing the range will solve your solution and save you some money.


As for a WAP (wireless access point), this is just a wireless switch. And just like a switch, it is used to get connected directly where as a repeater just bounces the signal. Access points are usually for larged scaled areas like businesses or campuses.
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#4
Artellos

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I don't really understand what Major Payne stated about buying an external wirless antenna, but I'm pretty sure it means a wireless repeater. Buying a wireless repeater will strengthen your signal just like a wired repeater does.

I think Major Payne knows what he's saying :)

Buying an external antenna might fix this issue.

Regards,
Olrik
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#5
Wanderer_of_the_Stars

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I think he does too.

Major Payne, is the an external wireless antenna you are referring to the same as a Hi-gain antenna that I was referring too?
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#6
Major Payne

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I think he does too.

Major Payne, is the an external wireless antenna you are referring to the same as a Hi-gain antenna that I was referring too?

Yes. There are some really great ones out there. This one is rather expensive, but only one at the router may be needed instead of one at the computer and one at the router: Commercial Grade Omni Directional 802.11 Antenna

List of more economical wi-fi antennas: NewEgg.com or TigerDirect.com

What is the best WiFi antenna for me?
10 tips for improving your wireless network
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#7
Wanderer_of_the_Stars

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The "10 tips for improving your wireless network" is a flawlfess guide. I get what you mean by external antenna for the laptop (via usb).


I know this is sarahd711's thread, but can you explain how to tell if your laptops integrated external antenna is good enough and if a usb network adapter would even help?
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#8
hfcg

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you may be having problems with a cordless phone or similar device operating on or near the same frequency.

Any electical device can cause interference, Fan, refridg., fluorescent lights, ETc...
And a high gain antenna is just that, an antenna.
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#9
Major Payne

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Any electrical device can cause interference, Fan, refridg., fluorescent lights, ETc...

The RFI from these devices would be very weak at 2.4 GHz unless the wireless device/antenna was very, very close to each other. Given the RFI generated may extend into higher frequencies, the level of signal strength drops off rapidly above the fundamental frequency.
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#10
Major Payne

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The "10 tips for improving your wireless network" is a flawlfess guide. I get what you mean by external antenna for the laptop (via usb).


I know this is sarahd711's thread, but can you explain how to tell if your laptops integrated external antenna is good enough and if a usb network adapter would even help?

Laptops with built-in wireless typically have excellent antennas and don't need to have their network adapters upgraded.


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