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Repair install - How does xp identify the disk?


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#1
travistee

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I'm doing a repair install on a system that had a motherboard replaced under warranty, but with a different model.
I have an XP OEM disk. Not a manufacturers oem disk.

I know xp counts the disk as one point when it checks to see if its the same computer.

This mobo has a raid and I may want to use that instead of the original disk.

1. Is it enough to give the disk the same name as the original? (The name you use when its formatted.)
Is there something else that identifies the disk that I can use to identify the new disk, so it looks the same
as the original.

2. Does the XP OEM disk also have a 120 day period for making changes like the retail XP, or does it do it
some other way? The retail XP only make you activate if its less than 120 days.

3. Can you activate after you change a component, then activate again after you change another component.
Would this let you make changes in steps, so it would not count all the changes at once?

Edited by travistee, 02 November 2008 - 08:18 AM.

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#2
Murray S.

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Howdy and welcome to G2G:

You are going to need a new XP cd..

OEM UnBranded - bought separately (not with a PC). Functionally identical to branded OEM. Can only be installed on ONE MACHINE. After that, even if you have a fire or a complete system failure and need to get a new machine . . . you will have to but a new copy of Windows XP. CANNOT MOVE FROM MACHINE TO MACHINE and CANNOT Replace/Update CPU or Motherboard (will fail validation when running Windows update) !!

I believe that answers your questions.

Murray

Edited by Murray S., 02 November 2008 - 09:43 AM.

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#3
travistee

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The branded OEM uses a code in the bios to make sure it can only be installed on that manufacturers machine.

The EULA says it has to be used only with the component it was purchased with.

I've had to do activations in the past when I changed some hardware, so I know it can accept some hardware changes and still
be able to be activated.

So, have you actually tried this?
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#4
Murray S.

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Changing the motherboard constitutes a new system altogether. Your OEM cd became permanently married to the old system you had (old motherboard). Therefore, it cannot legally be used with any other system even if the original system becomes landfill fodder.

The following quotes are from Microsoft..

In general, OEM software may not be transferred from one system to another system. However, the computer system can certainly be updated with new components without the requirement of a new software license. The only exception to this is the motherboard. If the motherboard is replaced , the computer system is deemed "new" and a new license would be required. Other PC components may be upgraded, including a hard drive. Though if the hard drive 3 is replaced/upgraded, the operating system must first be removed from the old hard drive. To restate: the operating system is "married" to the computer system on which it is originally installed.

_______

Reply from The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team to a query I posted 9/11/04 and was answered 9/20/04

Subject: OEM XP and upgrading/replacement mother boards
From: "System Builder Licensing" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> Sent: 9/20/2004 5:58:48 AM

Thank you for your post, Michael. Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on your customer's computer and the customer may maintain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software, with the exception of an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard. Unless upgraded or replaced under warranty, if the motherboard is upgraded, then a new computer has been created and the license of new operating system software is required. The original Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to another computer. There is no difference between pre installed OEM operating system software and OEM operating system software acquired after the purchase of a PC. Regardless, the OEM operating system must remain with the device that retains the motherboard. To activate Windows XP over the telephone, you can simply call a toll-free number displayed on your screen. A customer service representative will ask for the installation ID number displayed on the same screen, enter that number into a secure database, and return a confirmation ID to you. Once you have typed the confirmation ID, the activation process is complete. We hope this information has been helpful.

Thank you, The Microsoft OEM System Builder Licensing Team

__________

Again, you cannot legally use the key code. You MUST buy a new license.

Murray

Edited by Murray S., 02 November 2008 - 02:26 PM.

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#5
travistee

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You quoted " with the exception of an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard. Unless upgraded or replaced under warranty,"

And I said it was a motherboard under warranty.


So... it seems the disk doesn't really matter since I can upgrade components, including the processor.

Activation uses a point system, so what I was asking is if most of the components, hard drive, cdrom, processor, nic card, memory amount are the same as the old mobo, will activation even notice that it is a new mobo?

If I do have to activate it may accept it based on points. If not I may have to use their 50 digit number, if that fails
I guess I have to tell them I got a new mobo under warranty.

Do you know what they ask for to prove it was replaced under warranty.
Asus replaced my 2 year 11 month old mobo with a different model.

:)

Edited by travistee, 02 November 2008 - 03:06 PM.

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#6
Murray S.

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The motherboard MUST be exactly the same to circumvent the "new system" condition.

I would be installing and then use the "Call Home" feature and explain what happened. The "should" re-activate for you.

Murray

Edited by Murray S., 02 November 2008 - 03:11 PM.

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#7
fwoodward

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You may want to contact the manufacturer first and see if there's any updated cd key you need to use that oem cd. They'll probably have the most useful information regarding your situation.

Alternatively, I have replaced motherboards in systems and had to actually call Microsoft to get an activation. They have done it every time without exception. When you call them, be sure you're at the activation screen and have the long code ready to read off to them. They'll ask you how many computers this specific CD/key has been installed on before. Microsoft just wants to be sure you're using a valid cd key and that it's not going to be installed on more than 1 system.
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#8
travistee

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Its not a manufacturer OEM cd, its an XP OEM purchased with a qualifying hardware component.

Does XP think its a new motherboard if the chipset and controller are different, or does it still use the points system
for the other components.

I'll find out when I try it but I'm trying to understand how this works.
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#9
Murray S.

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A new motherboard makes it a new system period. Doesn't matter if every other piece of hardware is the same.

BTW, Microsoft closed that "piece of qualifying hardware" years ago. XP OEM cd's can only be sold with a complete system AND they are married to that system from then on.

Murray
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#10
The Admiral

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Right now, you have two licenses for Windows XP - the license you received when you purchased your computer, and the license you received when you bought the OEM version of Windows XP. You are currently using the former license, the license that came with the computer. Replacing the motherboard will either require you to reactivate the old license, which requires the manufacturer's CD, or to use the new license as part of this new CD, which uses the product key from the back of the CD sleeve. Since you don't have a manufacturer's CD (which should be easy to get since you are in warranty), you will have to use this new license, which will then be attached to this specific motherboard. By inputting the unused product key from the CD sleeve of the OEM version of Windows XP, it should activate over the internet without a need to "phone home", since it would be the first time the product key is used.

Speaking from Dell's stand point (I'm not sure about other manufacturers), Dell's XP installation CD does not require you to input the product key, since it is generated from data pulled from the BIOS. Inputting the product key from the sticker on the bottom of the laptop into the installation from a non-Dell CD (meaning OEM or Retail) will not yield positive results - the product key on the bottom of the laptop is not recognized by OEM/Retail versions of XP. But since every legal OEM or Retail version of XP comes with an unused, valid product key, just use that key and you will not have any problems activating Windows after the installation.
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