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the all-time battle


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#1
drmoneejd

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which is truely better?Oh, and what do you think is the best free anti-virus?

Edited by drmoneejd, 22 November 2008 - 06:52 PM.

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#2
makai

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Hmmm... those two kind of go together. I've never built a computer that was fast that didn't perform. Choosing components carefully is the key... not to mention doing with what you can afford!
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#3
drmoneejd

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well, i dont own a mac, but from what ive heard, mac is slower, but more reliable, and efficent, where as pc is faster, but not as much reliable or efficient, which is kind of what im tryin to figure out...and can you explain a little more on the components thing?
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#4
Ltangelic

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I'm not sure what you mean by performance here. In terms of security levels? Or problem-free? There is no best anti-virus, only reliable or non reliable ones. I use Avast on my home desktop.
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#5
drmoneejd

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problem free, because from what i ve heard, the "best" security stuuff slows your computer down, which to me kinda seems like its defeating the purpose. true, you wouldnt have any viruses, but your computer would run as slow as if you did...and i use avira, would use consider that reliable?
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#6
makai

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and can you explain a little more on the components thing?

What I meant was that you should choose components for the performance you require for the intended use of the computer. The main purpose of my current desktop is to edit video. I want it to encode my vid files quickly rather than slowly. That's why it's running a Core2Duo processor. I also want to be able to play a few games on it but not those games that require an outrageously priced video card. So, I built it using the components I needed to satisfy both requirements without having to spend money on a very expensive stuff. There are a ton of different components you can use to build up a computer, from $800 video cards to $400 motherboards. What will be "good enough" for you, you have to decide.
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#7
drmoneejd

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i understand...you make your computer not revolved around speed or reliability, but instead around you and your computers purpose...thats smart
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#8
jt1990

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The quote "best security software" isn't perfect - you're right. Both Norton and McAfee slow down computers A LOT and neither of them can stop 100% of all the viruses that are out there - nothing can. I personally despise both of them, but I'm not allowed to make recommendations, because I'm not staff yet.
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#9
drmoneejd

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yeah, i totally agree...what do you have to do to become staff?
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#10
BHowett

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Hi drmoneejd,

No one can tell you what the “best” AV out there is. We have a general consciences among us of what is, or might be better, but very few of us have tried every single AV out there. I can tell you this though, just because some AV’s out there use more resources and slow you system a little does not mean they are working harder and protecting you better :)

Two of the best free AV programs are Avast, and AntiVir. And remember only use one of them, and it's a good idea to set these to receive automatic updates so you are always as fully protected as possible from the newest virus threats.

And if your interested in becoming malware staff just click on the help wanted link in my signature and follow the application process :)
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#11
jt1990

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yeah, i totally agree...what do you have to do to become staff?


You basically go through a training series, learning how to use HijackThis, and other forms of malware removal.
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#12
drmoneejd

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and there's a place around here that teaches you all that stuff?
like, its not that i don't want to, but i wouldn't want that responsibility of being on staff, but i do want to learn more about malware...or, really, anything that has to do with a computer. like, the class i take teaches a good bit, and it great, but its not fast enough...do you (or anybody else reading this) know anywhere that's like, reliable to learn stuff, and doesn't cost money?
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#13
jt1990

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GeekU, right here on Geeks To Go, teaches malware removal.

http://www.geekstogo...ware-t4817.html

What is GeekU? It's an intensive, instructor lead training course that teaches the techniques and tools of malware removal. The training is geared toward removal in an online environment, like this forum. While it's hoped graduates will "pay it forward" by offering assistance here, it is not a requirement. All training is free.


You are not required to assist in malware removal here on the forums, because all the work is voluntary. However it is greatly appreciated if you do assist.
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#14
BHowett

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like, the class i take teaches a good bit, and it great, but its not fast enough...do you (or anybody else reading this) know anywhere that's like, reliable to learn stuff, and doesn't cost money?



What class are you taking? is it at another malware school? Here's the kicker GeekU is designed to allow you to work at your own pace. Therefore we cannot give you a specific timeline as to how long it will take to finish. However, there is no fast-track. It will take several months of steady work to reach graduation. Most people graduate in 4 to 6 months.


It’s not easy, and its time consuming, but it can be done with great personal reward. However you have to be willing to make the commitment, you cant just stay for a week or two and learn everything that is needed to effectively remove malware :)
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#15
drmoneejd

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oh, no, its nothing that specific. i take a computer class at a career center, cause im still in high school...its basically a two (for me three, cause i started early) year class that teaches everything on the A+ certification test...i truthfully dont know much yet, but trying to learn as much as i can...
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