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What Matters to You?


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#1
Fred21543

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I am starting this topic because I want to know what matters to you; what do you really value in life, and why do you value it? What is the most important thing in life, in your opinion? And why is this?

Your answer can be as simple or as complicated as you would like; I leave it open for all to discuss.
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#2
sari

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I'd have to say I value my relationships more than anything. When I was a young woman in my 20s, just out of college, I thought that things were important; I was worried about how I was doing compared to my peers, what possessions I owned, my looks, and any other manner of stupid superficial things. I think it was partly how I was raised - I came from a family in which it wasn't just that education was important; it was important that you got educated at the "right" school. I had family members that felt that certain people were beneath them, because they weren't well-educated enough, or didn't come from the right family. That's a very poor basis for being happy, and I wasn't happy. When I was 29, I met the person who became my husband. This may sound stupid or sappy, but he's the one who taught me that true happiness comes from within, and is not based on things. We've been married for 18 years, and still enjoy life together every day. His family has also taught me a lot. My mother-in-law has always accepted me and treats me like I'm her daughter. She's not well-educated; she got married at 17 and never went to college, but she's one of the most sensible, accepting, loving people I've ever met, and she's very important to me.

I also have 2 lovely daughters, ages 14 and 16. While being a parent can be extremely difficult, I also wouldn't trade it for the world. My daughters are growing into beautiful young women that I treasure and will always be proud of. While we have a nice house and don't want or need anything, the only things I have that are irreplaceable are not the things I own, they're the people I love. That's what is important to me.
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#3
**Brian**

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I must agree with Sari here :)

The most important thing in my life is my Family, and it took me almost dying. and the wise words of my father, to realize that you only have one shot at life, so you have to make the best of it. I am very blessed to have some really good friends, and they have helped me in ways that I cannot put into words - They make me stronger, and make me realize that even with my faults, I am still a good person, and I have had friends tell me that I am weak in some areas, and sometimes I show weakness, but this is RARE.

Being that I have a disability, I do not let it get me down, because the way I work, I would rather work around my disability, and concentrate on what I CAN do, rather then complain about the things I cannot do - sure, it is a challenge, but what in life isn't a challenge? I have been told that I am a special guy, my Mom's "Geek" and that I can do anything I set my mind to, so with people to continually remind me of that, it centers me in my life.

Relationships are also special for me, and someday, I hope to find "Ms. Right" - I have not found that special someone yet, but almost made a fatal mistake relationship wise a few years ago, which my good friends helped me to realize, and I snapped around :)

I want to be the best Son, Uncle, friend and confidant that I can be, so that someday I will be able to pass on what I know to the next generation, which I am doing now - I have heard people tell me that I would be a good father, and I hope that it is true, but I guess this is because of how I deal with the Nieces and Nephews :wave:

So, what matters to me is Life, Family, and the persuit of Happiness which I would not have had an opportunity to experience without my Mom and Dad, and the people who show me time and time again how special I am, or how special a situation is. I owe alot to those who don't hesitate to lend a hand when needed, and also to those who help me to learn things everyday.

My Motto is simple: I don't give UP, and I always believe in "Courage, Justice, Compassion" (The Motto of the CGC Tahoma) These three words just about say it all, and I will always remember this, for when I feel like throwing in the towel, I remember that giving up is NOT an option, (although sometimes it is best to give up in some situations) but if I gave up too easily, I would not be here today working so hard to make life better for myself and others :)

Hopefully, this response is not to sappy either, but it's the honest truth :) :help:

Brian
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#4
hfcg

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My loved ones are very important, But also the way I see myself.
I have set in my mind the kind of person that I wish to be and it is important to me to be that person.
Most of my values come from the teaching of how we are to treat people. (This is difficult to explain with out violating the TOU)
The way I act should never cause shame. That is important.
All of the money in the world is worthless if no one will speak with you.
Fairness, I can not stand when people are treated unfairly, any one, not just people I know. It is important to be fair with people at all times.

Edited by hfcg, 14 December 2008 - 08:52 PM.

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#5
andrewuk

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oddly, i take my family as a given though as i get older mortality seems to put this view under pressure.

however, at present (and i think the answer to this question varies as one progresses though life or as to what ones circumtances are) it really matters to me that honesty and integrity are recognised. or, more precisely that dishonesty and lack of integrity are duly exposed and punished. people enriching themsevles through dishonesty and lack of integrity is frustrating, but this invariably involves cheating others and that is what makes me angry.

where i see it and where i feel i can bring my weight to the matter and where i feel the repurcussions on myself are low, i stamp it out and that is important to me. annoyingly, i can only very rarely reveal that i was part of stamping it out. i find that people are very good and detecting injustice but are seldomly acting as a suitable force to see it through. short term self interest is a powerful counter force.

im afraid its the old (perhaps naive) thought that good triumphs evil etc. but i think in the current climate we are at least seeing some sort of rebalancing. i admit it will be short term. but that is important to me.
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#6
lurky

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With the absence of a strong family, the most important thing in my life are the friendships I've developed over these most recent years. I'm still young at twenty three years of age; but I've experienced happiness, love, pain, and loss. Only the amazing friends that surround me, and the sense of pride instilled in me by my grandfather have kept me strong.
Knowing that I've made more, with less, than so many other people has inspired me to keep my work ethic and pride. Those two things were taught to me at a very young age by my grandfather. This man had served in World War II, landing on Omaha Beech. After hearing stories, then later learning what exactly took place on Normandy, I developed a great deal of respect for him. I put weight in his words, and always looked up to him as the wisest man I've ever talked with.
In closing, I'd say what I value most are the words of a loved one. Weather I see them every day, or haven't seen them in a decade. Words spoken by a cherished individual hold weight with me.

I apologize for the poor structure, just something I haven't thought about in a while. Came out in a jumble. :) Bet you couldn't tell that English was a second major?
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#7
Troy

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I value doing right. This goes above the "law" about what's right and wrong, and hits the heart of morals. I have a strong sense of what's right and what's wrong. (Although I am not perfect).

This includes relationships and how people treat each other - family, friends, and other known and unknown people.

This includes things that you do when nobody is watching. (A really good example would be speeding down a deserted road, or how about flirting with someone other than your spouse)

Troy
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#8
YamiYasha

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Weird how so many people mention doing "right" and righting wrongs. I value the inner-self most (non-material) and the exploration of the inner-self (in some ways, your true self (as opposed to material thing, yourself in terms of other things))
Second to that is getting things done and with efficiency (with disregard for what others perceive right). While doing all the aforementioned, always to stay happy, do what I want, and not to define myself. *I am who I am. You are special, and no 2 instances of you are the same. Don't label yourself.*
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#9
countryboypride77

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#1 God (Due to the Terms of Use, I'll leave this at that.)
I highly value my parents and my four brothers and one sister. I tremendously value my five dogs. I am thankful for every day of my life. I'm very grateful that I have a full time job, a roof over my head, some food in the kitchen, a couple dollars in my wallet, and a 1/4 of a tank of gasoline in my truck. :)
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#10
candysue

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Time. I only have this day once. This moment once. When it's gone or misused it can never be recovered or relived. This and my higher power are my moral compass and a scale by which to determine whether or not others are allowed into my life. How I spend my time reveals what is important to me. What is important to me reveals where my heart and mind are. Where my heart and mind are reveals the kind of person I am. It's the most precious thing I give to someone else. I try to guard my time wisely from those who would steal and waste it. I try to give generously to those who can most benefit from it. Not only is my time limited and finite, I don't know what the limit is, which makes every moment all the more valuable. When I spend my time in a worthwhile way it centers me and humbles me and I feel fullfulled and at peace. Being aware and making decisions based on a finite commodity also helps me to remain in control of my own life and not allow others to step in uninvited. At the end of today could you give a good accounting of how you spent your time? I am a 45 yr old mother of 6, married, midwesterner.
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#11
eufouria

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I value the little things in life.. a feeling of accomplishment, a giggle from my grandson (the lil' booger! :) )... the sunshine... playing pinochle with my kids (specially when I win)... a job well done... quiet time in the midst of chaos... and kisses that will make your knees weak.

Oh, and a computer free from viruses. :)
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#12
Mad Dog Vee

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Religion and Politics because they're just two strands of philosophy

And from all that is what me base all of our decisions on.

However, we're not allowed to discuss religion and politics on this site at all, so I see little use for me at least, in the serious discussion forum.
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#13
chamber

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The most important thing to me is my beautiful fiancée who I'm lucky enough to marry in September!

I honestly don't know what I would do without her support and love, but I don't think that I would be the sane stable person posting this!! :)
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#14
hawklord

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my six year old alien, for her the world is out there and i want her to be as happy as i can make her,

the world we live in and to save it, we live here now and are killing it through money and forced material needs (mine costs more than yours),
i see so many children stuck in front of a television not knowing about the beauty thats growing around a city - being fed endless hours of marketing and ultimatly growing up not caring - unless its about the new brand,

give children the chance to save us, so their children can still have what we have,

(no - we don't have a television by choice, but i do have a daughter who excells in everything because we sit and do things, explore at the weekends or just talk)

sorry if it sounds like i'm preaching
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#15
comanighttrain

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I think my health is the most important thing. As long as i have that then i can build everything around it.
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