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I keep getting BSODs... HELP!


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#1
Krid P

Krid P

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Hello, I am having problems with one of my computers. I believe that the memory timing is wrong on my computer because I keep getting BSODs, and NO it isn't faulty RAM because I have tried new sticks and I keep getting BSODs.
Computer specs are:

-ASUS A8N32 SLI-Deluxe
-1TB Seagate HDD
-ATI HD 4870
-FX-60 CPU

The RAM sticks I have:

CORSAIR XTREME MEMORY SPEED (Platinum Series)
- CMX1024-3200PT XMS3200v5.1
- 1024MB 400MHz 3.3.3.8

It looks like this:

Posted Image


Since my motherboard didn't autodetect these speeds I wanted to adjust those values manually... and was confronted with so many various values that I don't know where I should assign these numbers to.

What I have found is the voltage setting... which I won't touch until I have the rest figured out as well.

Within the BIOS I found the MCT TIMING MODE section, which seems to handle memory timings. These are the options found within that BIOS page:

CAS LATENCY (the value of 2 goes here, correct?)
TRAS
TRP
TRCD
TRRD
TRC
TRFC
TRWT

and below that the MCT EXTRA TIMING MODE with the following options that can have various values asigned to them:

TREF
TWCL
R/W QUEUE BYPASS COUNT
BYPASS MAX
IDLE CYCLE LIMIT
DYNAMIC IDLE CYCLE CENTER
DDR DRIVING STRENGHT

Now, my question is this... with all those options available, which do I leave on Auto... and where do I assign the values of 3-3-3-8?

(Unless it needs to be something different than 3-3-3-8? Please tell me which one)


Thank you in advance for your help. Can't wait for your response. :)
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#2
Krid P

Krid P

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Actually I just checked CPU-Z, and the timing IS at 3-3-3-8, should my timing be different? Or is it possible that my DIMMS are bad? Because even with new RAM sticks I keep getting BSODs... I thought maybe I had a faulty HDD so I went and bought a new one, I even reformat VISTA on the new HDD, yet I am STILL getting BSODs... Can someone please help me? I know this has something to do with RAM, it's either my RAM timing, or the RAM dimms, but I just didnt know that the RAM DIMMS on the mobo could even go wrong?

PS: The DRAM frequency on CPU-Z shows 200.9MHz, and on my CORSAIR stick it says 400MHz, do you think that's the problem?

Here's SS of CPU-Z:

Posted Image

Posted Image
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#3
PedroDaGR8

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Lets see if it is the memory subsystem causing those errors.

Download the Memtest86+ Pre-compiled iso file (link in sig) and burn it as an image to disc. If you do not have software that can burn as an image. Then you can use ImgBurn (a free image burning software). A tutorial, with pictures, on how to use ImgBurn to burn an image can be found here. Once the disc is burned, you will need to restart and boot from the CD (you may have to change the boot priority in the BIOS to have it check the CD/DVD drive before the HD).

Let it run for atleast 12 hrs. If any errors come up then the memory subsystem is having problems. If you start seeing a decent number of errors rather quickly, then you can stop it because the subsystem is guaranteed bad.

Now what does memory subsystem mean? It means the hardware between the processor and the memory chips. When errors occur in this subsystem, the most often place is the memory chips themselves (but in some rare instances it can be elsewhere in the subsystem).
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#4
Krid P

Krid P

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Lets see if it is the memory subsystem causing those errors.

Download the Memtest86+ Pre-compiled iso file (link in sig) and burn it as an image to disc. If you do not have software that can burn as an image. Then you can use ImgBurn (a free image burning software). A tutorial, with pictures, on how to use ImgBurn to burn an image can be found here. Once the disc is burned, you will need to restart and boot from the CD (you may have to change the boot priority in the BIOS to have it check the CD/DVD drive before the HD).

Let it run for atleast 12 hrs. If any errors come up then the memory subsystem is having problems. If you start seeing a decent number of errors rather quickly, then you can stop it because the subsystem is guaranteed bad.

Now what does memory subsystem mean? It means the hardware between the processor and the memory chips. When errors occur in this subsystem, the most often place is the memory chips themselves (but in some rare instances it can be elsewhere in the subsystem).


So if there are errors occuring in the memory subsystem and it's NOT the memory chips, then what how can I fix the problem? Or is it not fixable and do I need a new motherboard???
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