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WindowsXP Startup Problem


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#1
jimsharpe10

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Yesterday I turned on my computer and it started running an index verification for my F drive. And said some file record segments were unreadable and at the end of it it always says an error occured so it keeps doing it every start up now. Please help.
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#2
happyrock

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I would back up everything as soon as you get booted up just in case the drive is dying...

Every time Windows restarts, Autochk.exe is called by the Kernel to scan all volumes to check if the volume dirty bit is set. If the dirty bit is set, autochk performs an immediate chkdsk /f on that volume. CHKDSK /f verifies file system integrity and attempts to fix any problems with the volume. It is always advisable to run chkdsk on volumes that have been improperly shutdown, however, there may be some situations in which running chkdsk after every improper shutdown is not possible or practical. In some cases, chkdsk may take several hours or even days to completely check the volume or may hang while checking the volume. In these situations, it is more practical to postpone the chkdsk until a more convenient time.

Chkntfs is a utility that enables a system administrator to exclude volumes from being checked by the autochk program. The utility is run from a command prompt and has the following command line options:

chkntfs drive: [...]
chkntfs /d
chkntfs /x drive: [...]
chkntfs /c drive: [...]

drive: Specifies a drive letter.
/D Restores the machine to the default
behavior; all drives are checked at boot
time and chkdsk is run on those that are
dirty. This undoes the effect of the /X
option.
/X Excludes a drive from the default boot-time
check. Excluded drives are not accumulated
between command invocations.
/C Schedules chkdsk to be run at the next
reboot if the dirty bit has been set.


If no switches are specified, chkntfs displays the status of the dirty bit for each drive.

Examples:

chkntfs /x c: This disables chkdsk from running on drive C:

chkntfs /x d: e: This disables chkdsk from running on drives D: and E:.

The chkntfs /x commands are not cumulative, the command overwrites any previous drive exclusions that have been established. In the above example, chkntfs only disables the chkdsk checking on drives D and E, drive C is not checked for the presence of a dirty bit.

The chkntfs utility works by modifying the BootExcecute value in the system registry. The BootExecute value is located in the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CURRENTCONTROLSET\CONTROL\Session Manager
The default value is:
BootExecute:REG_MULTI_SZ:autocheck autochk *
Chkntfs /x adds a /k parameter prior to the asterisk. The /k parameter excludes volumes from being checked for the presence of a dirty bit.

For example, the command..this is what you want to do

chkntfs /x F:

would modify this registry entry to autocheck autochk /k:f *

Chkdsk /f schedules itself to run at the next reboot by setting the dirty bit on the drive. Chkdsk /x disables the checking for this bit. Chkdsk /f can never run on volumes that are excluded from dirty bit checking by chkntfs.

In order to run a chkdsk /f on a drive that has been excluded by the chkntfs utility, you must run the chkntfs /d option to return the system to its normal state or edit the BootExecute value in the registry and remove the applicable drive letter from the /k parameter.
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#3
jimsharpe10

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It is one of my two slave drives that I barely ever use so I am not worried about loseing any info off it. Just to clarify Running chkntfs /x F: will make it skip the chkdsk for that drive at start up? Cause I really have no use for the drive anyway.
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#4
jimsharpe10

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It still said an unspecified problem occurred at the end and I restarted again and it runs the index verification again. Would it stop coming up at startup if I uninstall my f drive and could i do that without affecting my other drives? if I can how do I? Cause I dont really need my f drive anyways.
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#5
happyrock

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yep...if it were me ...I would throw the drive out too...
just be sure to unplug the computer from the wall before removing the drive...
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#6
jimsharpe10

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so i can just remove the drive i dont have to uninstall anything?
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