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Western Digital 1TB External Harddrive


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#1
mcdanielnc89

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Okay, I got my hard drive in the mail today. It's SUPPOSED to be a 1TB harddrive. The thing is, is that it says it only has 931 GB on it, lol... which is only 0.909180 terabytes. Is it vista just being dumb or what's going on?
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#2
Kemasa

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It is a matter of numbers and how it is advertised (don't believe everything that you read hyping an item).

The total data space is going to be one terabyte, but some of that is taken up when you format it. It is still data, but you can't use it for your data. Also, they might be using 1000 bytes instead of 1024. There are many things that can be done to confuse the consumer.
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#3
mcdanielnc89

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so it is 1tb..?
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#4
stettybet0

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Hard drive manufacturers typically list the number of bytes using decimal prefixes. That is, 1000 bytes per kilobyte, 1000 kilobytes per megabyte, 1000 megabytes per gigabyte, and 1000 gigabytes per terabyte. However, in the rest of the computer world, bytes are typically prefixed with binary prefixes. Using binary prefixes, there are 1024 bytes per kilobyte, 1024 kilobytes per megabyte, 1024 megabytes per gigabyte, and 1024 gigabytes per terabyte. With this information, we can conclude that a decimal terabyte contains 1000000000000 bytes. However, a binary terabyte contains 1099511627776 bytes. Divide 1000000000000 by 1099511627776 and you get 0.9094947017729282379150390625. Multiply that by 1024, and you get 931.322574615478515625, which is why Windows only recognizes ~931GB.
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#5
mcdanielnc89

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Thanks for the explanation!
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