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#1
Caffeine_Powered

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I'm working a friends computer real quick, but, as is my nature, I'm double checking everything. Came across something that I need some clarity on.

It's an older system with no real bells and whistles on it. P3 650 Mhz, 384mbs of ram. Had a 13gb WD HDD.

Want to either keep that and add a Maxtor 20.4GB hdd or take both out and stick in a more modern WD400EB- which is a Western Digital 40.0GB - which is all easy enough.

What I want to double check is if the Power Supply is enough. I'm pretty cautious with power supplies - Electronics major :). So I just wanted to double check. Call it a consult of sorts.

It's a Hipro 235 W. Normally I'd just say try it but since it's not really a name I'm familiar with I'm concerned about the volts/amps on the rails etc.

You can get technical with me since I should be able to follow - and if I don't, trust me, I'll ask.

thanks

Edited by Caffeine_Powered, 01 June 2009 - 11:32 PM.

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#2
cbarnard

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Welcome to G2G,

Use the eXtreme PSU Calculator Lite to determine your power supply unit (PSU) requirements. Plug in all the hardware you think you might have in 2 or 3 years (extra drives, bigger or 2nd video card, more RAM, etc.). Be sure to read and heed the notes at the bottom of the page. I recommend setting Capacitor Aging to 30%, and if you participate in distributive computing projects (e.g. BOINC or Folding@Home), I recommend setting TDP to 100%. Research your video card and pay particular attention to the power supply requirements for your card listed on your video card maker's website. If not listed, check a comparable card (same graphics engine and RAM) from a different maker. The key specifications, in order of importance are:

1. Current (amperage or amps) on the +12V rail,
2. Efficiency,
3. Total wattage.

Then look for power supply brands listed under the "Good" column of PC Mechanic's PSU Reference List. Ensure the supplied amperage on the +12V rails of your chosen PSU meets the requirements of your video card. Don't try to save a few dollars by getting a cheap supply. Digital electronics, including CPUs, RAM, and today's advanced graphics cards, need clean, stable power. A good, well chosen supply will provide years of service and upgrade wiggle room. I strongly recommend you pick a supply with an efficiency rating equal to, or greater than 80%. Look for the 80 Plus - EnergyStar Compliant label. And don't forget to budget for a good UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation).

(Credit to Digerati for this speech)



This will help you determine what you need...


Here is a link the specs of your friends current PSU

I would think most likely the PSU should work fine since it is an older computer, and you are replacing and not adding another HDD... and the RAM increase will only require slightly a bit more power... But try the calculator...

Good luck

Cbarnard

Edited by cbarnard, 06 June 2009 - 10:33 PM.

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#3
Caffeine_Powered

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Welcome to G2G,

Use the eXtreme PSU Calculator Lite to determine your power supply unit (PSU) requirements. Plug in all the hardware you think you might have in 2 or 3 years (extra drives, bigger or 2nd video card, more RAM, etc.). Be sure to read and heed the notes at the bottom of the page. I recommend setting Capacitor Aging to 30%, and if you participate in distributive computing projects (e.g. BOINC or Folding@Home), I recommend setting TDP to 100%. Research your video card and pay particular attention to the power supply requirements for your card listed on your video card maker's website. If not listed, check a comparable card (same graphics engine and RAM) from a different maker. The key specifications, in order of importance are:

1. Current (amperage or amps) on the +12V rail,
2. Efficiency,
3. Total wattage.

Then look for power supply brands listed under the "Good" column of PC Mechanic's PSU Reference List. Ensure the supplied amperage on the +12V rails of your chosen PSU meets the requirements of your video card. Don't try to save a few dollars by getting a cheap supply. Digital electronics, including CPUs, RAM, and today's advanced graphics cards, need clean, stable power. A good, well chosen supply will provide years of service and upgrade wiggle room. I strongly recommend you pick a supply with an efficiency rating equal to, or greater than 80%. Look for the 80 Plus - EnergyStar Compliant label. And don't forget to budget for a good UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation).

This will help you determine what you need...


Here is a link the specs of your friends current PSU

I would think most likely the PSU should work fine since it is an older computer, and you are replacing and not adding another HDD... and the RAM increase will only require slightly a bit more power... But try the calculator...

Good luck

Cbarnard

I was either gunna add another old HDD or replace it with a newer one.

That Calc is nice, thanks!

Can't find the p3 on it though so that might be a problem.
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#4
cbarnard

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If you can give the the info about the computer I can probably find the info out for you...

If it is a brand name just give me brand and model...

Other wise if you could get me the the motherboard CPU and ram info along with peripherals and I will figure it out... But I'm pretty sure the PSU can handle what you are looking to do.
Keep in mind what its max amp rating is so if there is something that has the system pushed to the edge then I would get another PSU... For that system they are Cheap... Newegg is a great place for parts if you are in the USA

Good luck

Cbarnard

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#5
Caffeine_Powered

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If you can give the the info about the computer I can probably find the info out for you...

If it is a brand name just give me brand and model...

Other wise if you could get me the the motherboard CPU and ram info along with peripherals and I will figure it out... But I'm pretty sure the PSU can handle what you are looking to do.
Keep in mind what its max amp rating is so if there is something that has the system pushed to the edge then I would get another PSU... For that system they are Cheap... Newegg is a great place for parts if you are in the USA

Good luck

Cbarnard


Yeah but you know how people can be with spending money and being without a computer.

I myself am pretty sure it can handle it as well, but like I said just wanted to double check, because 235W is quite a small PSU.

As far as the specs:

MoBo: Intel SE440BX-2

Right now
2 Sticks of RAM (work fine together)
1 - 128mb pc100
1- 256mb pc133 (down clocked to 100 due to the other stick)

was thinking of swapping the 128 for another stick, matching the latter.

CPU
Pentium 3 650Mhz

2 CD drives, neither appear to be burners.
Floppy Drive.

Graphics: not sure, the card says G2+ mila/88/20 but I don't think that's the name and google didn't bring anything.

It honestly doesn't look like a demanding card: IE: It's more or less just a silcon chip with no real memory attachments etc.

Personally I'd give him a laundry list of things, which would basically equate to a new computer. But seeing as how it's just for basic stuff, I figure i'm just gunna throw XP on there with as much HDD as I can muster (whether it be 2 drives = approx 38gb or 1 drive at 40 gb).

Noramlly I'd give him a laundry list of things basically equivalent to a new PC but since he's only using it for basic stuff it should be fine really. Just planning on throwing XP on there with as much HDD space as I can muster together.

Edited by Caffeine_Powered, 02 June 2009 - 01:10 AM.

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#6
Digerati

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Hmmm, nice sticky on the PSU calc - I wonder where you got that??:)

Hard drives consume power from their motors - big drives and small drives both have motors to spin the platters and to move the read/write heads around. So power consumption is basically unchanged when swapping out drives. Adding an additional HD adds about 20W demand on the supply.
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#7
Caffeine_Powered

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Hmmm, nice sticky on the PSU calc - I wonder where you got that??:)

Hard drives consume power from their motors - big drives and small drives both have motors to spin the platters and to move the read/write heads around. So power consumption is basically unchanged when swapping out drives. Adding an additional HD adds about 20W demand on the supply.

So should I opt for one big hdd or the two small ones?
Or is what you're saying it doesn't matter.

I'll probably end up trying the two though. Push my luck :)
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#8
Digerati

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I am saying the size of the hard drive has little to do with how much power it consumes so swapping 1 for 1 is not an issue. If adding a second drive, it only adds about 20W to the demand, and that is not normally a problem, unless new graphics cards and perhaps more RAM have been added too.

It would seem that P3s typically drew no more than 30watts so your 235W was probably considered big, or is not the original. I seem to remember 170 watt PSUs being popular with the P3s were around.

If everything else is working fine, I don't see a problem.
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#9
Caffeine_Powered

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Thank you, good to know.
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