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#1
Loke

Loke

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Hello.

First, I want to thank for their help in last problet I had. Super Thanks!

Now it is that I wonder, before it has had a router for my internet connection, I have no fiber connection, but it is via a modem from there I get my internet signals.


I wonder how a switch works towards the router, if it performs as well as a router? So to share the internet connection so many of the same apartment can use out of the same connection.
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#2
Digerati

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Hello.

First, I want to thank for their help in last problet I had. Super Thanks!

Now it is that I wonder, before it has had a router for my internet connection, I have no fiber connection, but it is via a modem from there I get my internet signals.


I wonder how a switch works towards the router, if it performs as well as a router? So to share the internet connection so many of the same apartment can use out of the same connection.

A "problet"? Is that a small problem? :)

Understand that routers connect two networks and that routers only have two connections. One goes to your network, the other connection goes to the "gateway device", typically a cable or DSL modem. However, most routers used for home networks typically have a 4-port 10/100Mb/s Ethernet switch integrated in the same box as the router. So to answer your question, a switch works great with a router - but not instead of a router.
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#3
Loke

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Excuse me for my rusty English, the best way I have planned is to practice. The problem is that you can analyze it all, which is a less good presence that I try to do better in English
The person is at the product sheet, that I wonder I work with to use that to share the connection to the internet?

Thanks again, I have been a member on this side now nearing one days, and were assisted by two problematic issues. this is appreciated ^ ^.

==
Do you want multiple computers to communicate in a network? Then a switch is the perfect device. This switch enables you to quickly create a network to which you can connect multiple computers.

This switch is perfectly suitable to use in combination with both 10Mbps and 100 Mbps network cards. Each switch network port has been fitted with a short-circuit protection. Furthermore, each port can be used as an uplink, meaning that you can easily connect other HUBs or switches to create an even bigger network.

Specifikationer:
• Number of ports: 5 x 10/100 Mbps UTP/RJ45 port
• Supports: IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T, IEEE 802.3U and 100BASE-TX
• Supports: Full and half duplex (Auto-Negotiation)
• Not operating system dependent

Additional specifications:
• Uplink facility for each port
• Network protocol: CSMA/CD
• External power supply: AC12V, 0.35A
• Operating temperature: 0 -50 °C
• Humidity: 10 - 90%
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#4
Digerati

Digerati

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Excuse me for my rusty English, the best way I have planned is to practice. The problem is that you can analyze it all, which is a less good presence that I try to do better in English

lol - no need to apologize, you do well. I am told English is one of the hardest languages to learn as a second language.

The person is at the product sheet, that I wonder I work with to use that to share the connection to the internet?

A switch allows multiple users to share a network connection, NOT the Internet. For each computer to have independent access to the Internet, there must be a router. The gateway device (the cable or DSL modem) only allows one network "node" or device to connect to it, typically a computer. That computer is assigned the IP address issued by the ISP - Internet service provider.

As mentioned, that one node can be a computer, or it can be a network as established by a router. A network can be just one computer connected to a router. When a router is used, the router assumes the IP address assigned by the ISP. As I said before, there are only two connections on a router - one goes to the "cloud" or Internet side, the other side is your network. When you connect your computer to the router, it assigns a new IP address to the computer (a great security measure).

To establish a network of multiple computers, you need a switch, typically a 4 or 8-port Ethernet switch. The switch can be a separate network device, or it can be integrated with the router, such as the very common, Linksys (note in the image it says, "Router with 4-Port Switch"). The router then assigns new, unique IP addresses to each computer on your network, but the Internet sees the activity as coming from just one IP address - the one issued by the ISP.

Hope that helps.
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