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New HD problems (Fdisk)


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#1
BlueScrn

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I recently purchased a new HD for a toshiba laptop. In all respects besides size (GB) the two are the same. I backed up the old drive completely (windows and all) using Linux (CD boot) and an external. After inserting the new HD and booting up in Back Track 3 (from CD) the new drive did not appear mounted. The drive is physically connected, as I found out with
>fdisk /dev/hda

Then it went through my mind that the drive was not formatted, so I proceeded to format the new HD with the end result of

Disk /dev/hda: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hda1 * 1 19457 156288321 7 HPFS/NTFS

The above was then written to the disk using "w"

After doing all of this the disk refuses to mount (I used >mount /dev/hda and >mount /dev/hda1 with no success.) Rebooting in linux did not fix this.

So I am stuck, I cannot copy my backup of the original HD onto the new drive because it will not mount.
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#2
Kemasa

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You have to create a filesystem before you can mount it (mkfs).

If the disks are the same size and layout and if you can have both disks on the system at the same time, you can copy all the data using the dd command.

For example:

dd if=/dev/hda of=/dev/hdb bs=32M

It will take quite some time to copy all the data since everything will be copied, including the unused space.

You can also create the filesystem, then used dump piped into restore to copy the data, but then you need to do it for each filesystem and it will not work for a Windoze filesystem.
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#3
BlueScrn

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To the best of my knowledge Fdisk does create a file system. In my case I chose NTFS.... (see first post) I do not think that is the issue.
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#4
Kemasa

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Under Linux, fdisk does not create a filesystem. It is not Windoze. You can use "fsck" to confirm that.

If you don't want to listen to the answer that I am giving, I won't waste my time anymore.
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