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new cpu and MB old hd


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#1
hog1340

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I am gonna build a pc. I will be using the hd from my old pc. It has xp on it, so when I put in the new cpu and mb, then connect HD will I have to reload xp?

Thanks
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#2
Neil Jones

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You can do, or you can repair it. Please don't expect to plug it in, fire it up and expect it to work as it probably won't.
Windows Repair: http://www.geekstogo...ws-XP-t138.html
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#3
rshaffer61

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First is the old hd from a name brand system?
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#4
hog1340

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Hi
Thanks for the replies.
The hd is a Seagate from my Dell Dimension. I am no longer using the Dell so will I be able to use the same version of XP I got with the computer? Or should I buy Vista or 7?

I am trying to do this inexpensive right now. I have no problem upgrading later.

Thanks
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#5
rshaffer61

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Nope not going to work.
The Dell installation is a OEM installation.
Original Equipment Manufacturer which means that installation is forever married to the original Motherboard. By changing that according to Microsoft's EULA you would need to format and install a new XP on it to be legal.
I would suggest Windows 7 to be honest if you are going to upgrade anyway.
Home Version is what most users will need unless you need the extra security offered by Pro or Ultimate.
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#6
hog1340

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Thanks for the reply. I will look to get a copy of "7".
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#7
makai

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Original Equipment Manufacturer which means that installation is forever married to the original Motherboard. By changing that according to Microsoft's EULA you would need to format and install a new XP on it to be legal.

This is not really true. There are caveats involved.

From the MS OEM EULA Q/A....

11. Rather than purchase completely new PCs, my organization performs in-place upgrades to the hardware on many of our computers. We often times only replace the motherboard, processor, and memory. Since the COA is still on the case and the OS is still installed on the hard drive, this computer is still licensed, right?
ANSWER. Generally, you may upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on your computer and maintain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software, with the exception of an upgrade or replacement of the motherboard. An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new personal computer." Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred from one computer to another. Therefore, if the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect then a new computer has been created, the original license expires, and a new full operating system license (not upgrade) is required. This is true even if the computer is covered under Software Assurance or other Volume License programs.

Basically, if you replace the motherboard because it's defective, you can legally use the XP license. The EULA doesn't state you have to replace the motherboard with the exact same model/type/manufacture motherboard, so you're free to use whatever you want.

This is FYI.
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#8
rshaffer61

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Thanks Makai and I will be reading the Q&A to bring myself up to speed on the actual EULA.
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#9
makai

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You're welcome Ron! I know about this from personal experience when my daughter's computer blew a USB port on the mb. I had to replace the mb, but since I couldn't get the same mb as before, I had to go with something else... same brand though, ASUS. MS didn't even give me a hard time about it.
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#10
Ferrari

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Just wanted to confirm what Makai said. I'm about to do this on a computer because the motherboards caps are bad. I contacted a friend of mine who has over 34 years of experience in all areas of computers. He said the exact same thing. Furthermore... I believe there is a limit though, being 2 motherboards total.

So you have the original, and then the replacement... that is it.
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#11
makai

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I believe there is a limit though, being 2 motherboards total.

The verbiage of the Q/A I linked does not place a limit on the number of times you can replace the motherboard if defective. MS knows there are instances where the motherboard may die and for them to bind your license to the motherboard in such a case may be illegal. Although I'm not a lawyer type, it makes sense to me.
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