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Building a Windows NT 4.0 System


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#1
gertnerbot

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I have to build a system that must use Windows NT 4.0. It also must be able to run SCSI drives and have a regular PCI slot (NOT PCI express or any of the new types of PCI). The motherboard must also have a RS232 connection in the back. I would prefer to use new parts and of course the processor does not have to be extremely fast. Any advice or opinions on this matter would be greatly appreciated!
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#2
Neil Jones

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Pretty much all boards these days have regular PCI slots.
You won't get any board these days that have driver support for NT 4. You can stick it on, though it'll look very sick and sorry for itself and half the stuff won't work.
If you look hard enough you can still buy boards with a RS232 (aka Serial) port on it.
Most SCSI equipment around the time of NT 4 was added by PCI card. You don't find it on modern day hardware.
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#3
123Runner

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There is also no USB support either.
It is old technology made for specific applications.
That is why anything you want to run will need to have its own drivers. It will be difficult to find.

Personally I have some that I rebuild for my work, but they are for specific applications.

What are you looking to do with it?
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#4
gertnerbot

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There is also no USB support either.
It is old technology made for specific applications.
That is why anything you want to run will need to have its own drivers. It will be difficult to find.

Personally I have some that I rebuild for my work, but they are for specific applications.

What are you looking to do with it?


I already have 2 systems that do the same thing as the 3rd and 4th system will do. There must be a motherboard out there that I can use. Windows NT is the basis for Windows 2000, so I think that I can get most of the hardware to work with it.
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#5
Neil Jones

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I already have 2 systems that do the same thing as the 3rd and 4th system will do. There must be a motherboard out there that I can use. Windows NT is the basis for Windows 2000, so I think that I can get most of the hardware to work with it.


Yes, but Windows 2000 was released February 2000. NT 4 was released in 1996, slap bang between Windows 95 and Windows 98.
Also many features that were previously part of the Windows 9x series were ported over to Windows 2000 so technically the basis for 2000 was a hybrid mix of the consumer usability of the Win9x range combined with the rock solid stability of Windows NT.

Win2000 has fallen out of mainstream support as well so very little current hardware will work with it too.
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#6
gertnerbot

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Well I found a solution to my problem. VirtualBox by Sun Microsystems will give me the ability to run two operating systems. I can have a current OS that will run my hardware then emulate Windows NT for my software.

http://www.sun.com/s...albox/index.jsp

Check it out, it's free and awesome!
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