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Hard disk


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#1
snooplove

snooplove

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Which hard disk is better?Magnetic one or the usual with the small "CD" on it?Some friends tell me magnetic but i want to be sure before i buy it.A and do i have to know if hard disk and memory card is compatible with mother board or sth else?
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#2
snooplove

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The hard disk will be 500 GB and the ram 2GB.Do they produce more heat than a 80GB hard disk and a 512 mb ram??Also do i have to check if the case of my tower is compatible with mother board or anything else?
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#3
Samm

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Hi there

I don't really understand your query about magnetic verses usual hard drives, but I can help with the rest of it.

1) Compatibility
Re. hard drive, you need to check what your motherboard supports in terms of interface. Modern motherboards should support SATA drives & most will support IDE as well, although they often only provide a single IDE port so if you have an IDE CD/DVD ROM drive, then best stick to SATA hard drives. SATA is also faster. Check the motherboard manual or website for the specs though.

Re. memory, again you need to check the motherboard specs to see what type of ram is supported. e.g DDR2 or DDR3, the speeds that are supported etc. Ideally you also need to know the FSB of the processor so you can select the appropriate ram speed. If you want to buy memory that you know will be compatible, then I suggest you go somewhere like Crucials website (www.crucial.com) to buy your ram and use their memory advisor.

2) Heat.
A larger hard drive won't produce more heat but a faster one will. i.e a 7200rpm drive will produce more heat than a 5400rpm drive but less heat than a 10,000rpm drive.
With memory, heat isn't really too much of an issue unless you overclock it.

3) Cases
Most cases are either ATX or microATX (mATX). ATX cases will take ATX or mATX motherboards. mATX cases will ONLY take mATX motherboards because they are physically large enough to house a full size ATX board.
If your case is a propriety one however (i.e. made by one of the large computer manufactures specifically for their systems), then you may have a problem. You may also need to check that the power supply you have is suitable for your new system.
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#4
snooplove

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Thanks that was helpful
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